Effects of duration of salt supplementation of sheep on rumen metabolism and the accumulation of elements

Phillips, Clive J.C., Mohamed, Mohamed O. and Chiy, Paul C. (2014) Effects of duration of salt supplementation of sheep on rumen metabolism and the accumulation of elements. Animal Production Science, 55 5: 603-610. doi:10.1071/AN13117


Author Phillips, Clive J.C.
Mohamed, Mohamed O.
Chiy, Paul C.
Title Effects of duration of salt supplementation of sheep on rumen metabolism and the accumulation of elements
Journal name Animal Production Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1836-0939
1836-5787
Publication date 2014-05-08
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AN13117
Volume 55
Issue 5
Start page 603
End page 610
Total pages 8
Place of publication Clayton, VIC Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Sheep may adapt rumen function in response to supplementary sodium, potentially affecting the metabolism and accumulation of this element and related elements in target tissues and organs. In this study, sheep were provided with a supplement of sodium added to silage for 3, 6 or 9 weeks. There was no evidence of adaptation of rumen function that would have benefited digestion or element absorption, on the contrary, after 6 and 9 weeks supplementation compared with 3 weeks, the buffering capacity of rumen solids was reduced and their density increased, with long particles that were associated with high dry matter contents. Potassium concentration in kidneys increased after 9 week of supplementation, in conjunction with reduced bone potassium concentration. In addition, the concentration of cadmium, an element known to compete with sodium, increased in rumen contents and its availability decreased. Copper was increased in the brain and eyes after 9 weeks of supplementation with NaCl, and after 6 weeks, copper in blood plasma decreased. It is concluded that there was evidence of a dynamic response to NaCl supplementation, which affected rumen solids and the accumulation of several important elements in key target organs.
Keyword Rumen function
Ruminant metabolism
Salt stress
Sheep
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 02 Dec 2014, 00:54:13 EST by Annette Winter on behalf of School of Veterinary Science