The impact of five lifestyle factors on nurses’ and midwives’ health: The Australian and New Zealand nurses’ and midwives’ e-cohort study

Tuckett, Anthony and Henwood, Tim (2014) The impact of five lifestyle factors on nurses’ and midwives’ health: The Australian and New Zealand nurses’ and midwives’ e-cohort study. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 53 3: 156-168. doi:10.1080/14635240.2014.978949


Author Tuckett, Anthony
Henwood, Tim
Title The impact of five lifestyle factors on nurses’ and midwives’ health: The Australian and New Zealand nurses’ and midwives’ e-cohort study
Journal name International Journal of Health Promotion and Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1463-5240
2164-9545
Publication date 2014-11-19
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14635240.2014.978949
Open Access Status
Volume 53
Issue 3
Start page 156
End page 168
Total pages 13
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The aim of this paper is to report nurses' and midwives' health, vitality and well-being in relation to adherence to current health behaviour recommendations. Healthy lifestyle factors constitute a core set of parameters required if an individual wants to live a healthy life, age successfully and avoid morbidity and a premature mortality. The investigation is an observation study of Australian and New Zealand nurses and midwives. Data were generated from the e-Cohort survey and the healthy lifestyle (HL; N = 338) group categorised as those adhering to physical activity and dietary guidelines, not smoking, consuming moderate alcohol and getting between 7 and 9 hours of sleep in a 24-hour period. All others were categorised as non-healthy lifestyle (NHL; N = 338) irrelevant of the number of factors present. It was found that HL group reported less work place activity but more leisure-time activity and had a lower BMI than NHL. In addition, the HL group was most likely to report improved sleep quality and least likely to report workplace and emotional barriers in day-to-day life. In contrast, those in the NHL group were less likely to report their health as excellent and were more likely to report a history of anxiety, depression and limitations in daily activities. It was concluded that collectively, the professions need to take action and members need to change lifestyle choices around physical activity, diet, smoking, alcohol and sleep. This study has important implications for workforce planners and administrators concerned about the well-being of individual members of the professions and the nursing and midwifery workforce.
Keyword Nurse
Midwife
Physical activity
Smoking
Alcohol
Diet
Sleep
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 20 Nov 2014, 08:48:26 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work