Relationships between tree growth and weather extremes: spatial and interspecific comparisons in a temperate broadleaf forest

Butt, N., Bebber, D. P., Riutta, T., Crockatt, M., Morecroft, M. D. and Malhi, Y. (2014) Relationships between tree growth and weather extremes: spatial and interspecific comparisons in a temperate broadleaf forest. Forest Ecology and Management, 334 209-216. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2014.09.006


Author Butt, N.
Bebber, D. P.
Riutta, T.
Crockatt, M.
Morecroft, M. D.
Malhi, Y.
Title Relationships between tree growth and weather extremes: spatial and interspecific comparisons in a temperate broadleaf forest
Journal name Forest Ecology and Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-1127
1872-7042
Publication date 2014-12-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.foreco.2014.09.006
Open Access Status
Volume 334
Start page 209
End page 216
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Three years of monthly growth increment data identified large interannual differences in growth rate across six contrasting species in a broadleaved, temperate forest with minimum management intervention (Wytham Woods, UK). Growth rates varied by species and canopy position, and were higher in canopy species. Growth rate in 2010 was up to 40% lower than in 2011 and 2012. This can best be explained as an effect of low temperature, which delayed the start of spring and the growing season. This had a greater impact on the growth of sub-canopy trees than that of canopy species. In temperate systems, late spring and summer is an important component of the whole growing season carbon balance because of long day length. In 2010 there were also periods of lower-than-average rainfall, which may additionally have constrained growth during the growing season. Fluctuations and seasonal changes in both temperature and rainfall are projected to continue, so we may expect to see increasing differences in growth and growth rates. A small effect of location relative to the nearest edge was also detected, with higher growth rates only found >50. m from the forest edge. The findings have implications for forest structure and productivity under climate change, and may thus inform current and future forest management.
Keyword Broadleaf temperate forest
Climate change
Dendrometer measurements
Forest carbon
Spring growth
Tree growth rates
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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