‘Better than anywhere else’: Lebanese settlement in Queensland, 1880–1947

Monsour, Anne (2014) ‘Better than anywhere else’: Lebanese settlement in Queensland, 1880–1947. Queensland Review, 21 Special Issue 02: 142-159. doi:10.1017/qre.2014.22

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Author Monsour, Anne
Title ‘Better than anywhere else’: Lebanese settlement in Queensland, 1880–1947
Journal name Queensland Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1321-8166
2049-7792
Publication date 2014-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/qre.2014.22
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 21
Issue Special Issue 02
Start page 142
End page 159
Total pages 18
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Until the 1960s, the settlement of Lebanese migrants in Queensland was characteristically regional, with the immigrants dispersed widely throughout the state. Immigrant settlement involves a dynamic and complex interaction between the immigrants and the social, political and economic structures of the receiving society. An analysis of the settlement experience of Lebanese immigrants in Queensland from the 1880s reveals the interplay of several factors, which resulted in a distinct pattern of settlement. Fundamental to this experience was the influence of racially exclusive state and Commonwealth legislation and immigration policies. Additionally, Queensland's particular geography and style of development, in conjunction with the predominance of self-employment and the segregation of Lebanese in petty commercial occupations such as hawking and shopkeeping, significantly determined the immigrants’ geographic settlement pattern. Finally, a less obvious but nonetheless important factor was the determination of the immigrants to settle permanently in Queensland. Whatever the reasons, this dispersed settlement pattern significantly shaped the lives of the immigrants and their descendants.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Tue, 18 Nov 2014, 00:04:22 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry