Diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a survey of Australasian emergency physicians and trainees

Rogers, Andrew, Furyk, Jeremy, Banks, Colin and Chu, Kevin (2014) Diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a survey of Australasian emergency physicians and trainees. EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia, 26 5: 468-473. doi:10.1111/1742-6723.12284


Author Rogers, Andrew
Furyk, Jeremy
Banks, Colin
Chu, Kevin
Title Diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a survey of Australasian emergency physicians and trainees
Journal name EMA - Emergency Medicine Australasia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1742-6723
1742-6731
Publication date 2014-10-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1742-6723.12284
Volume 26
Issue 5
Start page 468
End page 473
Total pages 6
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective

This study aims to establish current practice among Australasian emergency physicians and trainees on several aspects of the investigation of suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH).

Methods

An electronic questionnaire (SurveyMonkeyTM) was distributed to emergency physicians and trainees by email through the ACEM. Survey recipients were asked about demographics, followed by a series of questions relating to the investigation of SAH.

Results

There were 878 survey respondents (response rate 24%). Our data showed that 47.3% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that a CT brain within 6 h of headache onset is sufficient to exclude a diagnosis of SAH. For a CT performed within 12 h of ictus, 14.4% were satisfied that SAH could be excluded. After a negative CT scan, for further investigation of SAH, 88% of respondents preferred lumbar puncture to CT angiography. For detection of xanthochromia in the cerebrospinal fluid, 57.7% of respondents felt that spectrophotometry (vs visual inspection) is necessary to accurately diagnose SAH.

Conclusions

A range of information was collected regarding the investigation of suspected SAH. We report significant differences in the diagnostic approach of Australasian emergency physicians and trainees to this condition, in particular the utility of CT within 6 h for exclusion of SAH.
Keyword Computed tomography
Headache
Subarachnoid haemorrhage
Xanthochromia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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