Manual handling: differences in perceived effort, success rate and kinematics between three different pushing techniques

Varcin, Lynn, Claus, Andrew, Van Den Hoorn, Wolbert and Hodges, Paul (2014) Manual handling: differences in perceived effort, success rate and kinematics between three different pushing techniques. Ergonomics, 58 2: 268-277. doi:10.1080/00140139.2014.970586


Author Varcin, Lynn
Claus, Andrew
Van Den Hoorn, Wolbert
Hodges, Paul
Title Manual handling: differences in perceived effort, success rate and kinematics between three different pushing techniques
Journal name Ergonomics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1366-5847
0014-0139
Publication date 2014-10-24
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/00140139.2014.970586
Open Access Status
Volume 58
Issue 2
Start page 268
End page 277
Total pages 10
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study examined the perceived effort, success rates and kinematics for three push strategies in a simulated lateral patient transfer (horizontal slide). Thirteen healthy subjects (four males) completed three repetition pushing loads of 6, 10 and 14 kg in random order; with a spontaneous push strategy, then with a straight-back bent-knees (squat) strategy and the preparatory pelvic movement (‘rockback’) strategy in random order. Perceived effort and kinematic parameters measured at the onset of movement and at maximum push excursion were compared between strategies and between loads with repeated measures ANOVA. The spontaneous and ‘rockback’ strategies achieved the pushing task with less perceived effort across all loads than the squat push (P < 0.001). Only 3/13 participants were successful on all attempts at pushing the 14 kg load using a squat strategy, which contrasted with 12/13 participants when the spontaneous strategy or the ‘rockback’ strategy was used. Forward movement of the pelvis and forward trunk inclination may be positively associated with lower perceived effort in the push task.

Practitioner Summary: In a manual-handling task that simulated a lateral patient transfer (horizontal slide), perceived effort and success rates of three push strategies were compared. A straight-back bent-knees push (squat) strategy demonstrated greater perceived effort and lower success rates than a spontaneous push strategy, or a push strategy with preparatory ‘rockback’ pelvic movement.
Keyword Push
Squat
Patient handling
Training
Perceived effort
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 24 October 2014.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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