Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials supports the use of incentives for inducing response to electronic health surveys

David, Michael C. and Ware, Robert S. (2014) Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials supports the use of incentives for inducing response to electronic health surveys. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 67 11: 1210-1221. doi:10.1016/j.jclinepi.2014.08.001


Author David, Michael C.
Ware, Robert S.
Title Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials supports the use of incentives for inducing response to electronic health surveys
Journal name Journal of Clinical Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1878-5921
0895-4356
Publication date 2014-11-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2014.08.001
Open Access Status
Volume 67
Issue 11
Start page 1210
End page 1221
Total pages 12
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives

The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess incentive effectiveness on response to electronic health surveys.

Study Design and Setting

A systematic literature search of PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was performed from 1970 to March 2013. Two authors independently selected the trials, assessed methodological quality, and extracted data. Original authors were contacted for the missing information.

Results

The search strategy yielded nine trials (including 29,463 participants in total) that met eligibility criteria. For each of the incentive strategies examined, a random-effects model was used because of significant heterogeneity, and results were summarized as pooled odds ratios (ORs). Compared with no incentive, the offer of an incentive was seen to have a beneficial effect on response (OR, 1.48; 95% CI: 1.29, 1.71). Specifically, the odds of response were more than doubled when a monetary incentive was used (OR, 2.43; 95% CI: 1.60, 3.69) and increased when nonmonetary incentives were used (OR, 1.33; 95% CI: 1.17, 1.51).

Conclusion

These findings indicate that health researchers using electronic surveys can improve the quality of their research by offering incentives to potential participants.
Keyword Data collection
Electronic survey
Incentives
Meta-analysis
Response
Systematic review
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 10 Nov 2014, 14:37:42 EST by Matthew Lamb on behalf of School of Public Health