Developing situation awareness amongst nursing and paramedicine students utilising eye tracking technology and video debriefing techniques: a proof of concept paper

O'Meara, Peter, Munro, Graham, Williams, Brett, Cooper, Simon, Bogossian, Fiona, Ross, Linda, Sparkes, Louise, Browning, Mark and McCounan, Mariah (2015) Developing situation awareness amongst nursing and paramedicine students utilising eye tracking technology and video debriefing techniques: a proof of concept paper. International Emergency Nursing, 23 2: 94-99. doi:10.1016/j.ienj.2014.11.001

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Author O'Meara, Peter
Munro, Graham
Williams, Brett
Cooper, Simon
Bogossian, Fiona
Ross, Linda
Sparkes, Louise
Browning, Mark
McCounan, Mariah
Title Developing situation awareness amongst nursing and paramedicine students utilising eye tracking technology and video debriefing techniques: a proof of concept paper
Journal name International Emergency Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1755-599X
1878-013X
Publication date 2015-04
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ienj.2014.11.001
Open Access Status
Volume 23
Issue 2
Start page 94
End page 99
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective
The aims of this quasi-experimental before-and-after study were to first determine whether the use of eye tracking technology combined with video debriefing techniques has the potential to improve the quality of feedback and enhance situation awareness (SA) in simulated settings and second to determine students' satisfaction towards simulated learning.

Methods
Nursing and paramedicine students from three universities participated in three 8-minute simulation scenarios of acutely deteriorating patients. Eye tracking glasses video recorded the scenarios and tracked right eye movement. On completion, participants were questioned using the Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique, completed the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale (SSES), and provided textual feedback and received video-based verbal feedback.

Results
Participants lacked awareness of presenting medical conditions and patient environments and had poor recall of patient vital signs. Significant improvements in SA scores were demonstrated between the first and third scenarios (P = 0.04). Participants reported greater insight into their performance and were satisfied with simulated learning.

Conclusions
Use of visual field review techniques appears to enhance the use of realistic simulated practice as a means of addressing significant performance deficits. Eye tracking and point of view recording techniques are feasible and with applicable debriefing techniques could enhance clinical and situated performance.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 03 Nov 2014, 07:56:22 EST by Dr Fiona Bogossian on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work