Low status groups show in-group favoritism to compensate for their low status and compete for higher status

Rubin, Mark, Badea, Constantina and Jetten, Jolanda (2014) Low status groups show in-group favoritism to compensate for their low status and compete for higher status. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 17 5: 563-576. doi:10.1177/1368430213514122


Author Rubin, Mark
Badea, Constantina
Jetten, Jolanda
Title Low status groups show in-group favoritism to compensate for their low status and compete for higher status
Journal name Group Processes and Intergroup Relations   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1368-4302
1461-7188
Publication date 2014-09-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1368430213514122
Volume 17
Issue 5
Start page 563
End page 576
Total pages 14
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The present research investigated the intergroup allocation behavior of members of low-status groups. In two studies where status relations were either relatively illegitimate (Study 1, N = 139) or legitimate (Study 2, N = 114), undergraduate students completed a minimal group resource allocation task that took into account the intergroup status hierarchy. In both studies, members of low-status groups showed two forms of in-group favoritism. They selected resource allocation choices that (a) compensated for their low status and led to intergroup fairness (compensatory favoritism) and (b) competed with the out-group for status and led to positive distinctiveness for the in-group (competitive favoritism). These results suggest that members of low-status groups use in-group favoritism to make their group (a) as good as the high-status out-group and (b) better than the high-status out-group. The findings support the idea that in-group favoritism can serve different functions.
Keyword Ingroup Favoritism
Intergroup fairness
Low status groups
Minimal group
Social identity theory
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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