A predictive model for beneficial use of rehabilitated mine tailings for grazing cattle after mine closure

Ng, J. C., Noller, B. N. and Bruce, S. L. (2014). A predictive model for beneficial use of rehabilitated mine tailings for grazing cattle after mine closure. In: Life-of-Mine 2014: Delivering sustainable legacies through integrated life-of-mine planning. Life-of-Mine 2014, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, (563-572). 16-18 July 2014.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Ng, J. C.
Noller, B. N.
Bruce, S. L.
Title of paper A predictive model for beneficial use of rehabilitated mine tailings for grazing cattle after mine closure
Conference name Life-of-Mine 2014
Conference location Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 16-18 July 2014
Convener David Mulligan
Proceedings title Life-of-Mine 2014: Delivering sustainable legacies through integrated life-of-mine planning
Series The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy Publication Series No 4/2014
Place of Publication Carlton, VIC, Australia
Publisher AUSIMM
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9781925100082
Start page 563
End page 572
Total pages 10
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Mining activities can result in the transfer of harmful elements, including arsenic and lead, into the environment. In Australia, one of the potential future uses of rehabilitated mine land is to stock grazing animals. Elemental uptake is dependent on bioavailable fraction for adsorption upon exposure. Bioavailability data are generally lacking in order to provide realistic health risk assessments relating to harmful elements from mine tailings in Australian conditions. Another key component of risk assessment is the ability to estimate a realistic exposure, or dose rate, of the tailings to the grazing cattle over a set period of time. Hence, we aimed to conduct grazing trials directly on rehabilitated tailings facilities in order to provide valuable in situ information on heavy metal dose rates and associated accumulation. For the laboratory-based evaluation of comparative bioavailability, groups of cattle were fed five days a week on a normal diet spiked with mine tailings or soluble pure salts of target elements (eg sodium arsenate, sodium arsenite and lead acetate) for about eight months. For the field validation, cattle were allowed to graze directly on rehabilitated tailings facilities over a similar length of time. Blood and a biopsy of the muscle and liver were periodically collected to monitor arsenic accumulation. At necropsy, blood, muscle, liver, kidney and other saleable tissues were measured for arsenic concentrations. Although this study was focused on arsenic, lead and other metals were also measured. Predictive models for arsenic and other metals have been established to calculate the maximum grazing duration without the risk of exceeding specific food safety guidelines. The outcome of this study is a predictive model for maximum beneficial use of certain rehabilitated tailings for cattle grazing where grazing activities do not impact on the integrity of the tailings dams.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 31 Oct 2014, 14:29:45 EST by Robyne Anderson on behalf of National Res Centre For Environmental Toxicology