Cold water immersion enhances recovery of submaximal muscle function following resistance exercise

Roberts, Llion A., Nosaka, Kazunori, Coombes, Jeff S. and Peake, Jonathan M. (2014) Cold water immersion enhances recovery of submaximal muscle function following resistance exercise. American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 307 8: R998-R1008. doi:10.1152/ajpregu.00180.2014


Author Roberts, Llion A.
Nosaka, Kazunori
Coombes, Jeff S.
Peake, Jonathan M.
Title Cold water immersion enhances recovery of submaximal muscle function following resistance exercise
Journal name American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0363-6119
1522-1490
Publication date 2014-10-15
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1152/ajpregu.00180.2014
Open Access Status
Volume 307
Issue 8
Start page R998
End page R1008
Total pages 11
Place of publication Bethesda, MD, United States
Publisher American Physiological Society
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We investigated the effect of cold water immersion (CWI) on the recovery of muscle function and physiological responses after high-intensity resistance exercise. Using a randomized, cross-over design, 10 physically active men performed high-intensity resistance exercise followed by one of two recovery interventions: 1) 10 min of CWI at 10°C or 2) 10 min of active recovery (low-intensity cycling). After the recovery interventions, maximal muscle function was assessed after 2 and 4 h by measuring jump height and isometric squat strength. Submaximal muscle function was assessed after 6 h by measuring the average load lifted during 6 sets of 10 squats at 80% of 1 repetition maximum. Intramuscular temperature (1 cm) was also recorded, and venous blood samples were analyzed for markers of metabolism, vasoconstriction, and muscle damage. CWI did not enhance recovery of maximal muscle function. However, during the final three sets of the submaximal muscle function test, participants lifted a greater load (P < 0.05, Cohen's effect size: 1.3, 38%) after CWI compared with active recovery. During CWI, muscle temperature decreased ∼7°C below postexercise values and remained below preexercise values for another 35 min. Venous blood O2 saturation decreased below preexercise values for 1.5 h after CWI. Serum endothelin-1 concentration did not change after CWI, whereas it decreased after active recovery. Plasma myoglobin concentration was lower, whereas plasma IL-6 concentration was higher after CWI compared with active recovery. These results suggest that CWI after resistance exercise allows athletes to complete more work during subsequent training sessions, which could enhance long-term training adaptations.
Keyword Cryotherapy
Recovery
Performance
Thermoregulation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 29 Oct 2014, 13:34:06 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences