An evaluation of the sensitivity of acute flaccid paralysis surveillance for poliovirus infection in Australia

Watkins, Rochelle E., Martin, P. Anthony J., Kelly, Heath, Madin, Ben and Watson, Charles (2009) An evaluation of the sensitivity of acute flaccid paralysis surveillance for poliovirus infection in Australia. BMC Infectious Diseases, 9 162.1-162.13. doi:10.1186/1471-2334-9-162


Author Watkins, Rochelle E.
Martin, P. Anthony J.
Kelly, Heath
Madin, Ben
Watson, Charles
Title An evaluation of the sensitivity of acute flaccid paralysis surveillance for poliovirus infection in Australia
Journal name BMC Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2334
Publication date 2009-09-30
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2334-9-162
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 9
Start page 162.1
End page 162.13
Total pages 13
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Subject 2725 Infectious Diseases
Abstract Background: World Health Organization (WHO) targets for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance, including the notification of a minimum rate of AFP among children, are used to assess the adequacy of AFP surveillance for the detection of poliovirus infection. Sensitive surveillance for poliovirus infection in both developed and developing countries is essential to support global disease eradication efforts. We applied recently developed methods for the quantitative evaluation of disease surveillance systems to evaluate the sensitivity of AFP surveillance for poliovirus infection in Australia. Methods: A scenario tree model which accounted for administrative region, age, population immunity, the likelihood of AFP, and the probability of notification and stool sampling was used to assess the sensitivity of AFP surveillance for wild poliovirus infection among children aged less than 15 years in Australia. The analysis was based on historical surveillance data collected between 2000 and 2005. We used a surveillance time period of one month, and evaluated the ability of the surveillance system to detect poliovirus infection at a prevalence of 1 case per 100 000 persons and 1 case per million persons. Results: There was considerable variation in the sensitivity of AFP surveillance for poliovirus infection among Australian States and Territories. The estimated median sensitivity of AFP surveillance in Australia among children aged less than 15 years was 8.2% per month at a prevalence of 1 case per 100,000 population, and 0.9% per month at a prevalence of 1 case per million population. The probability that Australia is free from poliovirus infection given negative surveillance findings following 5 years of continuous surveillance was 96.9% at a prevalence of 1 case per 100,000 persons and 56.5% at a prevalence of 1 case per million persons. Conclusion: Given the ongoing risk of poliovirus importation prior to global eradication, long term surveillance is required to provide a high degree of confidence in freedom from poliovirus infection in Australia, particularly if a low prevalence of infection is assumed. Adherence to the WHO surveillance targets would considerably improve the sensitivity of surveillance for poliovirus infection in Australia.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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