Using polymorphisms in FKBP5 to define biologically distinct subtypes of posttraumatic stress disorder: Evidence from endocrine and gene expression studies

Mehta, Divya, Gonik, Mariya, Klengel, Torsten, Rex-Haffner, Monika, Menke, Andreas, Rubel, Jennifer, Mercer, Kristina B., Puetz, Benno, Bradley, Bekh, Holsboer, Florian, Ressler, Kerry J., Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram and Binder, Elisabeth B. (2011) Using polymorphisms in FKBP5 to define biologically distinct subtypes of posttraumatic stress disorder: Evidence from endocrine and gene expression studies. Archives of General Psychiatry, 68 9: 901-910. doi:10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.50

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Author Mehta, Divya
Gonik, Mariya
Klengel, Torsten
Rex-Haffner, Monika
Menke, Andreas
Rubel, Jennifer
Mercer, Kristina B.
Puetz, Benno
Bradley, Bekh
Holsboer, Florian
Ressler, Kerry J.
Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram
Binder, Elisabeth B.
Title Using polymorphisms in FKBP5 to define biologically distinct subtypes of posttraumatic stress disorder: Evidence from endocrine and gene expression studies
Journal name Archives of General Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-990X
1538-3636
Publication date 2011
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.50
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 68
Issue 9
Start page 901
End page 910
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chicago, IL, United States
Publisher American Medical Association
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract Context: Polymorphisms in the gene encoding the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) regulating co-chaperone FKBP5 have been shown to alter GR sensitivity and are associated with an increased risk to develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Objective: To investigate interactions of the FKBP5 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs9296158 and PTSD symptoms on baseline cortisol level, low-dose dexamethasone suppression, and whole-blood gene expression. Design: Association of FKBP5 genotypes and PTSD symptoms with endocrine measures and genome-wide expression profiles. Setting: Waiting rooms of general medical and gynecological clinics of an urban hospital at Emory University. Participants: The 211 participants were primarily African American (90.05%) and of low socioeconomic status and had high rates of trauma and PTSD. Main Outcome Measures: Baseline and post-dexamethasone suppression cortisol measures and gene expression levels. Results: In our endocrine study, we found that only risk allele A carriers of rs9296158 showed GR supersensitivity with PTSD; in contrast, baseline cortisol levels were decreased in PTSD only in patients with the GG genotype. Expression of 183 transcripts was significantly correlated with PTSD symptoms after multiple testing corrections. When adding FKBP5 genotype and its interaction with PTSD symptoms, expression levels of an additional 32 genes were significantly regulated by the interaction term. Within these 32 genes, previously reported PTSD candidates were identified, including FKBP5 and the IL18 and STAT pathways. Significant overrepresentation of steroid hormone transcription factor binding sites within these 32 transcripts was observed, highlighting the fact that the earlier-described genotype and PTSDdependent differences in GR sensitivity could drive the observed gene expression pattern. Results were validated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and replicated in an independent sample (N=98). Conclusions: These data suggest that the inheritance of GR sensitivity-moderating FKBP5 polymorphisms can determine specific types of hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenal axis dysfunction within PTSD, which are also reflected in gene-expression changes of a subset of GRresponsive genes. Thus, these findings indicate that functional variants in FKBP5 are associated with biologically distinct subtypes of PTSD.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 27 Oct 2014, 14:41:59 EST by Sylvie Pichelin on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute