Chicks prefer to peck at insect-like elongated stimuli moving in a direction orthogonal to their longer axis

Clara, Elena, Regolin, Lucia, Vallortigara, Giorgio and Rogers, Lesley J. (2009) Chicks prefer to peck at insect-like elongated stimuli moving in a direction orthogonal to their longer axis. Animal Cognition, 12 6: 755-765. doi:10.1007/s10071-009-0235-y


Author Clara, Elena
Regolin, Lucia
Vallortigara, Giorgio
Rogers, Lesley J.
Title Chicks prefer to peck at insect-like elongated stimuli moving in a direction orthogonal to their longer axis
Journal name Animal Cognition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1435-9448
1435-9456
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10071-009-0235-y
Volume 12
Issue 6
Start page 755
End page 765
Total pages 11
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Spontaneous preferences towards possible prey have been little investigated using targets in motion. Preferences of domestic chicks (Gallus gallus) to peck at video-images of stimuli representing live insects moving along their longer body axis (i.e. "forwards") or along the shorter body axis (i.e. "sideways") were investigated. Chicks presented with both types of stimulus displayed a significant preference for pecking at stimuli moving sideways. This preference was already present on day 1 post-hatching, and it strengthened on day 6 for those chicks that had experienced pecking at live insects. Head angles used to fixate the stimuli prior to pecking were also analysed and were consistent (i.e. 30°-35° and 60°-65°) with those reported for fixation of non-edible targets (larger stimuli at a distance). In a first control experiment the same video-presented stimuli were used but the insect's legs were removed to reduce flickering. In a second control experiment, paper-printed images of the whole insect were used. In both cases, the sideways direction of movement was clearly preferred. Overall, our data show that chicks have a spontaneous preference to peck at video-images resembling live insects moving along their shorter body axis. Sideways movement may constitute a crucial signal attracting chicks' attention and enhancing predatory responses possibly because of stronger stimulation of motion detectors
Keyword Chick
Gallus gallus
Insect prey
Motion
Pecking Preferences
Predisposition
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes For ERA

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 25 Oct 2014, 01:17:43 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute