Differences in social and vocal behavior between left- and right-handed common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

Gordon, Dianne J. and Rogers, Lesley J. (2010) Differences in social and vocal behavior between left- and right-handed common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 124 4: 402-411. doi:10.1037/a0019736


Author Gordon, Dianne J.
Rogers, Lesley J.
Title Differences in social and vocal behavior between left- and right-handed common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)
Formatted title
Differences in social and vocal behavior between left- and right-handed common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)
Journal name Journal of Comparative Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0735-7036
1939-2087
Publication date 2010
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0019736
Open Access Status
Volume 124
Issue 4
Start page 402
End page 411
Total pages 10
Place of publication Washington, DC United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) show either a left- or right-hand preference for reaching to pick up food and they retain the same preference throughout adult life. We compared the behavior of 10 right-handed and 10 left-handed marmosets, matched for age and sex. They were presented with live crickets both when alone and when in their social group. The marmosets captured more crickets and the latency to capture the first cricket was shorter when they were in a group than when they were alone. This effect of social facilitation was significantly greater for right- than left-handed individuals. The number of vocalizations (tsik, crackle, very brief whistle, cough, and phee) produced by the left- and right-handed marmosets differed significantly: right-handed marmosets produced an increased number of all of these calls when the crickets were presented, whereas left-handed marmosets did not show a change from pretesting levels. The right-handed marmosets also produced more tsik (mobbing) calls than left-handed marmosets when they were presented with a fear-inducing stimulus and performed more head cocking and parallax movements than the left-handed marmosets. Hence, hand preference is associated with differences in exploratory and social behavior, the latter including vocal communication.
Keyword Hand Preference
Common marmosets
Vocalizations
Social Facilitation
Mobbing responses
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 24 Oct 2014, 14:52:13 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute