Active cognitive lifestyle is associated with positive cognitive health transitions and compression of morbidity from age sixty-five

Marioni, Riccardo E., Valenzuela, Michael J., van den Hout, Ardo, Brayne, Carol and Matthews, Fiona E. (2012) Active cognitive lifestyle is associated with positive cognitive health transitions and compression of morbidity from age sixty-five. PLoS One, 7 12: e50940.1-e50940.6. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0050940


Author Marioni, Riccardo E.
Valenzuela, Michael J.
van den Hout, Ardo
Brayne, Carol
Matthews, Fiona E.
Title Active cognitive lifestyle is associated with positive cognitive health transitions and compression of morbidity from age sixty-five
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0050940
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 7
Issue 12
Start page e50940.1
End page e50940.6
Total pages 6
Place of publication San Francisco, CA, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Three factors commonly used as measures of cognitive lifestyle are education, occupation, and social engagement. This study determined the relative importance of each variable to long term cognitive health in those with and without severe cognitive impairment.

Methods: Data came from 12,470 participants from a multi-centre population-based cohort (Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study). Respondents were aged 65 years and over and were followed-up over 16 years. Cognitive states of no impairment, slight impairment, and moderate/severe impairment were defined, based on scores from the Mini-Mental State Examination. Multi-state modelling was used to investigate links between component cognitive lifestyle variables, cognitive state transitions over time, and death.

Results: Higher educational attainment and a more complex mid-life occupation were associated with a lower risk of moving from a non-impaired to a slightly impaired state (hazard ratios 0.5 and 0.8), but with increased mortality from a severely impaired state (1.3 and 1.1). More socially engaged individuals had a decreased risk of moving from a slightly impaired state to a moderately/severely impaired state (0.7). All three cognitive lifestyle variables were linked to an increased chance of cognitive recovery back to the non-impaired state.

Conclusions: In those without severe cognitive impairment, different aspects of cognitive lifestyle predict positive cognitive transitions over time, and in those with severe cognitive impairment, a reduced life-expectancy. An active cognitive lifestyle is therefore linked to compression of cognitive morbidity in late life.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 24 Oct 2014, 11:32:52 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute