Phenotypic and discordant-monozygotic analyses of stress and perceived social support as antecedents to or sequelae of risk for depression

Coventry, William L., Medland, Sarah E., Wray, Naomi R., Thorsteinsson, Einar B., Heath, Andrew C. and Byrne, Brain (2009) Phenotypic and discordant-monozygotic analyses of stress and perceived social support as antecedents to or sequelae of risk for depression. Twin Research And Human Genetics, 12 5: 469-488. doi:10.1375/twin.12.5.469


Author Coventry, William L.
Medland, Sarah E.
Wray, Naomi R.
Thorsteinsson, Einar B.
Heath, Andrew C.
Byrne, Brain
Title Phenotypic and discordant-monozygotic analyses of stress and perceived social support as antecedents to or sequelae of risk for depression
Journal name Twin Research And Human Genetics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1832-4274
1839-2628
Publication date 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1375/twin.12.5.469
Open Access Status
Volume 12
Issue 5
Start page 469
End page 488
Total pages 20
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2009
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The associations between social support and depression, and between stress and depression have been the subject of considerable research, and although this has included longitudinal designs, these have rarely controlled for genetic effects that mediate these associations. The sample comprised 7,356 female and 4,882 male participants aged 18-95 from the Australian NHMRC Twin Registry (ATR). Of these, between 100 and 324 female pairs and between 41 and 169 male pairs, depending on the measure, were monozygotic (MZ) pairs discordant for depression. We use the co-twin control design in combination with prospective analyses to explore the association between a composite of predictors (perceived social support, stress, and support × stress) and depression. With familial effects included, both perceived support and stress were antecedents to, and sequelae of, depression, but no stress-buffering occurred. With familial effects controlled, stress was a sequela of a prior depressive episode, and neither lack of support nor stress were antecedents to depression, though their interaction approached significance for males. The male twin who later became depressed had previously reported lower perceived support in the face of multiple stressors compared to his co-twin who did not become depressed. We show that associations commonly observed with prospective designs are partly due to familial factors
Keyword Depression
Discordant
Life Events
Monozygotic twin
Social support
Stress
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes For ERA

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 23 Oct 2014, 17:12:57 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute