The senses in practice: enhancing the quality of care for residents with dementia in care homes

Brown Wilson, Christine, Swarbrick, Caroline, Pilling, Mark and Keady, John (2013) The senses in practice: enhancing the quality of care for residents with dementia in care homes. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 69 1: 77-90. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2012.05992.x


Author Brown Wilson, Christine
Swarbrick, Caroline
Pilling, Mark
Keady, John
Title The senses in practice: enhancing the quality of care for residents with dementia in care homes
Journal name Journal of Advanced Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0309-2402
1365-2648
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2012.05992.x
Volume 69
Issue 1
Start page 77
End page 90
Total pages 14
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aim.  The study aimed to develop, deliver, and evaluate a training programme in care homes to enhance the quality of care for people living with dementia based on the principles of relationship-centred care expressed through the Senses Framework.

Background.  There are increasing numbers of people living with dementia worldwide with a growing proportion requiring residential long-term care. This makes the quest for enhancing the quality of care and quality of life for people with dementia ever more pressing.

Design.  A mixed-methods design was used adopting a Practice Development approach. The findings from one care home in the North West of England are reported.

Methods.  Eight facilitated workshops based on the principles of relationship-centred care were completed and evaluated in 2010, using pre- and postintervention design. A focus group was undertaken with staff on completion of the study to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the practice/training context, augmented by case examples of changes in practice identified from the study workshops.

Results.  Structured questionnaires were used to profile the care home before and after the training. Following the workshops, staff felt more able to collect and use biographical information. In particular, staff reported how this information supported them to initiate meaningful conversations with the person with dementia as part of everyday care routines, thus improving overall feelings of well-being.

Conclusion.  Using a biographical approach to care planning structured through the Senses Framework helped staff to develop a greater understanding of the person with dementia.
Keyword CARE profiles
Dementia
Long-term care
Nursing
Practice development
Senses framework
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 30 MAR 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 22 Oct 2014, 22:26:26 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work