High incidence of contaminating maternal cell overgrowth in human placental mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) cultures: a systematic review

Heazlewood, Celena F., Sherrell, Helen, Ryan, Jennifer, Atkinson, Kerry, Wells, Christine A. and Fisk, Nicholas M. (2014) High incidence of contaminating maternal cell overgrowth in human placental mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) cultures: a systematic review. Stem Cells Translational Medicine, 3 11: 1305-1311. doi:10.5966/sctm.2014-0051

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Author Heazlewood, Celena F.
Sherrell, Helen
Ryan, Jennifer
Atkinson, Kerry
Wells, Christine A.
Fisk, Nicholas M.
Title High incidence of contaminating maternal cell overgrowth in human placental mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) cultures: a systematic review
Journal name Stem Cells Translational Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2157-6564
2157-6580
Publication date 2014-11
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.5966/sctm.2014-0051
Open Access Status
Volume 3
Issue 11
Start page 1305
End page 1311
Total pages 7
Place of publication Durham, NC, United States
Publisher AlphaMed Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Placenta is a readily accessible translationally advantageous source of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) currently used in cryobanking and clinical trials. MSCs cultured from human chorion have been widely assumed to be fetal in origin, despite evidence that placental MSCs may be contaminated with maternal cells, resulting in entirely maternally derived MSC cultures. To document the frequency and determinants of maternal cell contamination in chorionic MSCs, we undertook a PRISMA-compliant systematic review of publications in the PubMed, Medline, and Embase databases (January 2000 to July 2013) on placental and/or chorionic MSCs from uncomplicated pregnancies. Of 147 studies, only 26 (18%) investigated fetal and/or maternal cell origin. After excluding studies that did not satisfy minimal MSC criteria, 7 of 15 informative studies documented MSC cultures as entirely fetal, a further 7 studies reported cultured human chorionic MSC populations to be either maternal (n = 6) or mixed (n = 1), whereas 1 study separately cultured pure fetal and pure maternal MSC from the same placenta. Maternal cell contamination was associated with term and chorionic membrane samples and greater passage number but was still present in 30% of studies of chorionic villous MSCs. Although most studies assume fetal origin for MSCs sourced from chorion, this systematic review documents a high incidence of maternal-origin MSC populations in placental MSC cultures. Given that fetal MSCs have more primitive properties than adult MSCs, our findings have implications for clinical trials in which knowledge of donor and tissue source is pivotal. We recommend sensitive methods to quantitate the source and purity of placental MSCs.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 22 Oct 2014, 10:16:03 EST by Professor Nicholas Fisk on behalf of Faculty of Medicine