The effects of physical exercise on functional performance, quality of life, cognitive impairment and physical activity levels for older adults aged 65 years and older with a diagnosis of dementia: a systematic review

Fox, Benjamin, Hodgkinson, Brent and Parker, Deborah (2014) The effects of physical exercise on functional performance, quality of life, cognitive impairment and physical activity levels for older adults aged 65 years and older with a diagnosis of dementia: a systematic review. JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports, 12 9: 158-276. doi:10.11124/jbisrir-2014-1714

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Author Fox, Benjamin
Hodgkinson, Brent
Parker, Deborah
Title The effects of physical exercise on functional performance, quality of life, cognitive impairment and physical activity levels for older adults aged 65 years and older with a diagnosis of dementia: a systematic review
Journal name JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2202-4433
Publication date 2014-12
Year available 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.11124/jbisrir-2014-1714
Open Access Status
Volume 12
Issue 9
Start page 158
End page 276
Total pages 119
Place of publication Adelaide, Australia
Publisher University of Adelaide, Faculty of Health Sciences
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Physical inactivity is considered the primary precursor to unmet needs for older adults with dementia and exercise has shown potential to benefit healthy, older adults. While no conclusive evidence is available to suggest these benefits extend to older adults with dementia, a growing body of literature targets this question specifically.

Objective: The primary, overarching question asked by this review was: does physical exercise affect functional performance, quality of life, cognitive impairment and physical activity levels of older adults (>65 years) with a diagnosis of dementia?

Inclusion criteria 
Types of participants
Participants were older adults, aged 65 years and over, with a confirmed dementia diagnosis

Types of intervention(s)
Physical exercise interventions were included

Types of studies
Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials were included.

Types of outcomes
Four primary outcome measures were the focus on this review: cognition, functional ability,
quality of life and physical activity levels

Search strategy: Published material was sourced from the following four databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ISI Web of Science. Grey literature was searched for using ALOIS, Google Scholar and ProQuest. Initial keywords included: “cognitive impairment”, “dementia”, “Alzheimer’s disease”, "cognitive defect" OR "cognition disorders" AND “exercise”, “physical activity”, "exertion", OR "functional" AND “intervention”, "program", "training" OR "treatment" AND “older adults", "elderly", "old age" OR "geriatric" 

Methodological quality: The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using Joanna Briggs Institute
Meta Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI) software.

Data collection: Data was extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction
tool from JBI-MAStARI.

Data synthesis: A quantitative meta-analysis was performed where possible. Otherwise, data-synthesis is in
the form of narrative review.

Results: Seventeen studies were included in this review; they evaluated the effectiveness of aerobic, resistance and multimodal exercise interventions on a wide range of outcome measures, including: cognition, general physical function, mobility, strength, balance, flexibility, cardiovascular fitness, quality of life and physical activity levels. Only three studies were found to be of “good” quality and showed benefits for older adults in the domains of: cognition, activities of daily living, mobility, strength and balance. Results from “moderate” and “poor” quality studies were mixed and inconclusive.

Conclusions: While potential exists for exercise to benefit the older adult with dementia, no definitive conclusion can be reached, as the volume of “good” quality literature is limited for this population.
Keyword Dementia
Exercise
Older adults
Aaged care
Functional ability
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 21 Oct 2014, 09:22:22 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work