Fight and flight: evidence of aggressive capitulation in the face of fear messages from terrorists

Iyer, Aarti, Hornsey, Matthew J., Vanman, Eric J., Esposo, Sarah and Ale, Shalini (2014) Fight and flight: evidence of aggressive capitulation in the face of fear messages from terrorists. Political Psychology, 36 6: 631-648. doi:10.1111/pops.12182


Author Iyer, Aarti
Hornsey, Matthew J.
Vanman, Eric J.
Esposo, Sarah
Ale, Shalini
Title Fight and flight: evidence of aggressive capitulation in the face of fear messages from terrorists
Journal name Political Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0162-895X
1467-9221
Publication date 2014-04-23
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/pops.12182
Volume 36
Issue 6
Start page 631
End page 648
Total pages 18
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract In an era of digital technology and the Internet, terrorists can communicate their threats directly to citizens of Western countries. Yet no research has examined whether these messages change individuals' attitudes and behavior or the psychological processes underlying these effects. Two studies (conducted in 2008 and 2010) examined how American, Australian, and British participants responded to messages from Osama bin Laden that threatened violence if troops were not withdrawn from Afghanistan. Heightened fear in response to the message resulted in what we call "aggressive capitulation," characterized by two different group-protection responses: (1) submission to terrorist demands in the face of threats made against one's country and (2) support for increased efforts to combat the source of the threat but expressed in abstract terms that do not leave one's country vulnerable. Fear predicted influence over and above other variables relevant to persuasion. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
Keyword Fear
Terrorism
Political attitudes
Persuasion
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 23 April 2014.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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