Electronic care records - can they fulfil their promise?

Wainwright, Claire E. and Tullis, Elizabeth (2014) Electronic care records - can they fulfil their promise?. Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, 13 6: 608-609. doi:10.1016/j.jcf.2014.04.009


Author Wainwright, Claire E.
Tullis, Elizabeth
Title Electronic care records - can they fulfil their promise?
Journal name Journal of Cystic Fibrosis   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1569-1993
1873-5010
Publication date 2014-12
Year available 2014
Sub-type Editorial
DOI 10.1016/j.jcf.2014.04.009
Open Access Status
Volume 13
Issue 6
Start page 608
End page 609
Total pages 2
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract There is a growing use of electronic health care records with adoption rates reported recently of 69% in the United States and 57% in Canada. Unfortunately the huge promise of electronic care records (ECRs) to improve access to information including information on costs, along with improved care coordination and planning, and improved access to alerts and decision tools to enhance patient safety, along with an ability to easily audit and benchmark health care outcomes and enhance clinical research, has to date not been generally realised. There have been many research papers published examining the perceived barriers to update of the ECR as perceived by physicians and a systematic review identified 8 main categories of barriers. An appreciation of these barriers is helpful to ensuring better success in ECR uptake.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Editorial
Collection: Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 21 Oct 2014, 01:39:19 EST by System User on behalf of Child Health Research Centre