Predictors of prescribed medication use for depression, anxiety, stress, and sleep problems in mid-aged Australian women

Schofield, Margot J. and Khan, Asaduzzaman (2014) Predictors of prescribed medication use for depression, anxiety, stress, and sleep problems in mid-aged Australian women. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 49 11: 1835-1847. doi:10.1007/s00127-014-0896-y


Author Schofield, Margot J.
Khan, Asaduzzaman
Title Predictors of prescribed medication use for depression, anxiety, stress, and sleep problems in mid-aged Australian women
Journal name Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0933-7954
1433-9285
Publication date 2014-06-07
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00127-014-0896-y
Open Access Status
Volume 49
Issue 11
Start page 1835
End page 1847
Total pages 13
Place of publication Heidelberg Germany
Publisher Springer Medizin
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective

The study examined prevalence of self-reported use of medication recommended or prescribed by a doctor for depression, anxiety, stress, and sleep problems; and modelled baseline factors that predicted use over 3 years for each condition.

Methods

Analyses were undertaken on the 2001 and 2004 surveys of mid-aged women in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. Dependent variables were self-reported use in past 4 weeks of medications recommended or prescribed by a doctor for depression, anxiety, stress, or sleep problems in 2001 and 2004. Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) were used to predict medication use for each condition over 3 years.

Results

Prevalence of prescribed medication use (2001, 2004) for each condition was depression (7.2, 8.9 %), anxiety (7.4, 9.0 %), stress (4.8, 5.7 %), and sleep problems (8.7, 9.5 %). Multivariable analyses revealed that odds of medication use across 3 years in all four conditions were higher for women with poorer mental and physical health, using hormone replacement therapy (HRT), or having seen a counsellor; and increased over time for depression, anxiety, and stress models. Medication use for depression was also higher for overweight/obese women, ex-smokers, and unmarried. Medication use for anxiety was higher for unmarried and non-working/low occupational women. Medication use for stress was higher for non-working women. Additional predictors of medication for sleep were surgical menopause, and area of residence.

Conclusions

Self-reported use of prescribed medication for four mental health conditions is increased over time after controlling for mental and physical health and other variables. Research needs to explore decision-making processes influencing differential rates of psychoactive medication use and their relationship with health outcomes.
Keyword Psychotropic medications
Depression
Anxiety
Stress
Sleep
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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