Early recovery signs of an Australian grassland following the management of Parthenium hysterophorus L.

Belgeri, Amalia, Navie, Sheldon C., Vivian-Smith, Gabrielle and Adkins, Steve W. (2014) Early recovery signs of an Australian grassland following the management of Parthenium hysterophorus L.. Flora: Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants, 209 10: 587-596. doi:10.1016/j.flora.2014.06.010

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Author Belgeri, Amalia
Navie, Sheldon C.
Vivian-Smith, Gabrielle
Adkins, Steve W.
Title Early recovery signs of an Australian grassland following the management of Parthenium hysterophorus L.
Formatted title
Early recovery signs of an Australian grassland following the management of Parthenium hysterophorus L.
Journal name Flora: Morphology, Distribution, Functional Ecology of Plants   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0367-2530
Publication date 2014-10
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.flora.2014.06.010
Open Access Status
Volume 209
Issue 10
Start page 587
End page 596
Total pages 10
Place of publication Jena, Germany
Publisher Urban und Fischer Verlag
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Parthenium weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.) is believed to reduce the above- and below-ground plant species diversity and the above-ground productivity in several ecosystems. We quantified the impact of this invasive weed upon species diversity in an Australian grassland and assessed the resulting shifts in plant community composition following management using two traditional approaches. A baseline plant community survey, prior to management, showed that the above-ground community was dominated by P. hysterophorus, stoloniferous grasses, with a further high frequency of species from Malvaceae, Chenopodiaceae and Amaranthaceae. In heavily invaded areas, P. hysterophorus abundance and biomass was found to negatively correlate with species diversity and native species abundance. Digitaria didactyla Willd. was present in high abundance when P. hysterophorus was not, with these two species, contributing most to the dissimilarity seen between areas. The application of selective broad leaf weed herbicides significantly reduced P. hysterophorus biomass under ungrazed conditions, but this management did not yet result in an increase in species diversity. In the above-ground community, P. hysterophorus was partly replaced by the introduced grass species Cynodon dactylon L. (Pers.) 1 year after management began, increasing the above-ground forage biomass production, while D. didactyla replaced P. hysterophorus in the below-ground community. This improvement in forage availability continued to strengthen over the time of the study resulting in a total increase of 80% after 2 years in the ungrazed treatment, demonstrating the stress that grazing was imposing upon this grassland-based agro-ecosystem and showing that it is necessary to remove grazing to obtain the best results from the chemical management approach.
Keyword Chemical control
Grazing
Invasive species
Plant community composition
Species diversity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2015 Collection
 
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