Sexually dimorphic bandicoots (Marsupialia: Peramelemorphia) from the Oligo-Miocene of Australia, first cranial ontogeny for fossil bandicoots and new species descriptions

Travouillon, Kenny J., Archer, Michael, Hand, Suzanne J. and Muirhead, Jeanette (2014) Sexually dimorphic bandicoots (Marsupialia: Peramelemorphia) from the Oligo-Miocene of Australia, first cranial ontogeny for fossil bandicoots and new species descriptions. Journal of Mammalian Evolution, 1-27. doi:10.1007/s10914-014-9271-8


Author Travouillon, Kenny J.
Archer, Michael
Hand, Suzanne J.
Muirhead, Jeanette
Title Sexually dimorphic bandicoots (Marsupialia: Peramelemorphia) from the Oligo-Miocene of Australia, first cranial ontogeny for fossil bandicoots and new species descriptions
Journal name Journal of Mammalian Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1064-7554
1573-7055
Publication date 2014-09-04
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10914-014-9271-8
Open Access Status
Start page 1
End page 27
Total pages 27
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Peramelemorphians (bandicoots and bilbies) are unique among mammals in having the shortest gestation period. Very little is known about their evolutionary history primarily because until recently their fossil record was scarce. Here we describe two new species, Madju variae, gen. et sp. nov., from late Oligocene to middle Miocene deposits from the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, Queensland, and the Kutjamarpu Local Fauna, South Australia, and Madju encorensis, gen. et sp. nov., also from Riversleigh WHA but from the late middle to early late Miocene. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that they are best regarded as basal members of the Superfamily Perameloidea. Species of Madju are unusual in showing a distinct reduction in size through time, possibly reflecting environmental change from the early to late Miocene. Madju variae is the first-known sexually dimorphic fossil peramelemorphian. The preservation and representation of specimens of M. variae is exceptional, enabling documentation of ontogenetic development from juvenile to old adult stage suggesting that juveniles of M. variae developed more slowly than their modern counterparts and that lactation lasted for a longer time. If so, the short gestation of modern peramelemorphians would appear to be a specialisation that might have evolved sometime after the middle Miocene.
Keyword Fossil bandicoots
Sexual dimorphism
Cranial ontogeny
Riversleigh World Heritage Area
Kutjamarpu Local Fauna
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print September 2014.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Earth Sciences Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 21 Oct 2014, 00:29:27 EST by System User on behalf of School of Earth Sciences