Micro-breaks matter: a diary study on the effects of energy management strategies on occupational well-being

Zacher, Hannes, Brailsford, Holly A. and Parker, Stacey L. (2014) Micro-breaks matter: a diary study on the effects of energy management strategies on occupational well-being. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 85 3: 287-297. doi:10.1016/j.jvb.2014.08.005


Author Zacher, Hannes
Brailsford, Holly A.
Parker, Stacey L.
Title Micro-breaks matter: a diary study on the effects of energy management strategies on occupational well-being
Journal name Journal of Vocational Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0001-8791
1095-9084
Publication date 2014-12-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jvb.2014.08.005
Open Access Status
Volume 85
Issue 3
Start page 287
End page 297
Total pages 11
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Organizational researchers and practitioners are increasingly interested in self-regulatory strategies employees can use at work to sustain or improve their occupational well-being. A recent cross-sectional study on energy management strategies suggested that many work-related strategies (e.g., setting a new goal) are positively related to occupational well-being, whereas many micro-breaks (e.g., listening to music) are negatively related to occupational well-being. We used a diary study design to take a closer look at the effects of these energy management strategies on fatigue and vitality. Based on conservation of resources theory, we hypothesized that both types of energy management strategies negatively predict fatigue and positively predict vitality. Employees (N = 124) responded to a baseline survey and to hourly surveys across one work day (6.7 times on average). Consistent with previous research, between-person differences in the use of work-related strategies were positively associated with between-person differences in vitality. However, results of multilevel analyses of the hourly diary data showed that only micro-breaks negatively predicted fatigue and positively predicted vitality. These findings suggest that taking micro-breaks during the work day may have short-term effects on occupational well-being, whereas using work-related strategies may have long-term effects.
Keyword Energy management
Micro-breaks
Fatigue
Vitality
Diary study
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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