Admission to and continuation of inpatient stroke rehabilitation in Queensland, Australia: a survey of factors that contribute to the consultant's decision

Hayward, Kathryn S., Aitken, Philip D., Barker, Ruth N. and Brauer, Sandra G. (2014) Admission to and continuation of inpatient stroke rehabilitation in Queensland, Australia: a survey of factors that contribute to the consultant's decision. Brain Impairment, 15 2: 88-98. doi:10.1017/BrImp.2014.12


Author Hayward, Kathryn S.
Aitken, Philip D.
Barker, Ruth N.
Brauer, Sandra G.
Title Admission to and continuation of inpatient stroke rehabilitation in Queensland, Australia: a survey of factors that contribute to the consultant's decision
Journal name Brain Impairment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1443-9646
1839-5252
Publication date 2014-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/BrImp.2014.12
Open Access Status
Volume 15
Issue 2
Start page 88
End page 98
Total pages 11
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aim: To evaluate factors that may contribute to the decision of the consultant medical officer (CMO) to: (1) admit a person with stroke to inpatient rehabilitation from acute hospitalisation; and (2) continue or cease inpatient rehabilitation.

Methods: A web-based survey of CMOs practising in Queensland Australia, who were members of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Geriatric Medicine (n ~ 90) or the Queensland Stroke Clinical Network (n ~ 30) was completed. The survey contained two sections to explore factors that could: (1) favour or disfavour admission to inpatient rehabilitation from acute hospitalisation; and (2) favour continuation or cessation of inpatient rehabilitation. Open and closed questions were used.

Results: Twenty-one CMOs (13–20% response rate, 43% geriatrician) completed the survey. Factors related to physical function, along with the presence of social supports favoured admission, while the presence of behavioural and cognitive impairments and a lack of staff capacity disfavoured admission. Improvements in function favoured continuation of inpatient rehabilitation, while a lack of improvement favoured cessation.

Conclusion: Factors related to the patient, their social support network and the organisation were found to influence the decision of the CMO to admit a person with stroke to inpatient rehabilitation from acute hospitalisation. Once in rehabilitation, demonstration of benefit was consistently reported to indicate continued service need.
Keyword Stroke
Rehabilitation
Admission
Continuum of care
Surveys
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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