A population-based spatio-temporal analysis of Clostridium difficile infection in Queensland, Australia over a 10-year period

Furuya-Kanamori, Luis, Robson, Jenny, Soares Magalhaes, Ricardo J., Yakob, Laith, McKenzie, Samantha J., Paterson, David L., Riley, Thomas V. and Clements, Archie C. A. (2014) A population-based spatio-temporal analysis of Clostridium difficile infection in Queensland, Australia over a 10-year period. Journal of Infection, 69 5: 447-455. doi:10.1016/j.jinf.2014.06.014


Author Furuya-Kanamori, Luis
Robson, Jenny
Soares Magalhaes, Ricardo J.
Yakob, Laith
McKenzie, Samantha J.
Paterson, David L.
Riley, Thomas V.
Clements, Archie C. A.
Title A population-based spatio-temporal analysis of Clostridium difficile infection in Queensland, Australia over a 10-year period
Formatted title
A population-based spatio-temporal analysis of Clostridium difficile infection in Queensland, Australia over a 10-year period
Journal name Journal of Infection   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0163-4453
1532-2742
Publication date 2014-11
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jinf.2014.06.014
Open Access Status
Volume 69
Issue 5
Start page 447
End page 455
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher W.B. Saunders
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives
To identify the spatio-temporal patterns and environmental factors associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Queensland, Australia.

Methods
Data from patients tested for CDI were collected from 392 postcodes across Queensland between May 2003 and December 2012. A binomial logistic regression model, with CDI status as the outcome, was built in a Bayesian framework, incorporating fixed effects for sex, age, source of the sample (healthcare facility or community), elevation, rainfall, land surface temperature, seasons of the year, time in months and spatially unstructured random effects at the postcode level.

Results
C. difficile was identified in 13.1% of the samples, the proportion significantly increased over the study period from 5.9% in 2003 to 18.8% in 2012. CDI peaked in summer (14.6%) and was at its lowest in autumn (10.1%). Other factors significantly associated with CDI included female sex (OR: 1.08; 95%CI: 1.01–1.14), community source samples (OR: 1.12; 95%CI: 1.05–1.20), and higher rainfall (OR: 1.09; 95%CI: 1.02–1.17). There was no significant spatial variation in CDI after accounting for the fixed effects in the model.

Conclusions
There was an increasing annual trend in CDI in Queensland from 2003 to 2012. Peaks of CDI were found in summer (December–February), which is at odds with the current epidemiological pattern described for northern hemisphere countries. Epidemiologically plausible explanations for this disparity require further investigation.
Keyword Clostridium difficile
Infection
Spatio-temporal analysis
Australia
Epidemiology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 17 Oct 2014, 11:52:44 EST by Dr Ricardo J. Soares Magalhães on behalf of School of Public Health