Occupational aspirations account for educational aspirations: questioning the Wisconsin model of socioeconomic attainment

Coates, Rebecca L., Western, Mark C. and Skrbis, Zlatko (2012). Occupational aspirations account for educational aspirations: questioning the Wisconsin model of socioeconomic attainment. In: TASA 2012: The 17th Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference 2012, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia, (). 26-29 November, 2012.

Author Coates, Rebecca L.
Western, Mark C.
Skrbis, Zlatko
Title of paper Occupational aspirations account for educational aspirations: questioning the Wisconsin model of socioeconomic attainment
Conference name TASA 2012: The 17th Australian Sociological Association Annual Conference 2012
Conference location St. Lucia, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 26-29 November, 2012
Place of Publication Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Publisher The Australian Sociological Association
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Published abstract
Open Access Status
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
This paper explores an established link in the Wisconsin model of socioeconomic attainment, that between educational and occupational aspirations. According to this framework, aspirations are important mediators of educational and occupational attainment. The topic of aspirations has generated a large amount of research since the 1950s but sociological interest has waned in recent years. Further, researchers have investigated many correlates of educational and occupational aspirations, but very few have explored how occupational and educational aspirations are related. Rather, the status attainment model argues that educational and occupational aspirations develop simultaneously, and without influence on each other. This paper questions this assumption and asks whether occupational aspirations predict educational aspirations. We use wave 1 of the Social Futures and Life Pathways (2006) data, a longitudinal study of 7000 Queensland secondary school students, to examine how occupational aspirations affect educational aspirations for young people who differ by immigrant generation status and socioeconomic background. The results suggest that occupational aspirations account for educational aspirations, and that socioeconomic background explains more variation in aspirations than do generational status or ethnicity.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 09 Oct 2014, 16:49:29 EST by Rebecca Coates on behalf of School of Architecture