Clinical and pathological findings in green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Gladstone, Queensland: investigations of a stranding epidemic

Flint, Mark, Eden, Paul A., Limpus, Colin J., Owen, Helen, Gaus, Caroline and Mills, Paul C. (2014) Clinical and pathological findings in green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Gladstone, Queensland: investigations of a stranding epidemic. Ecohealth, 12 2: 298-309. doi:10.1007/s10393-014-0972-5


Author Flint, Mark
Eden, Paul A.
Limpus, Colin J.
Owen, Helen
Gaus, Caroline
Mills, Paul C.
Title Clinical and pathological findings in green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Gladstone, Queensland: investigations of a stranding epidemic
Formatted title
Clinical and pathological findings in green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Gladstone, Queensland: investigations of a stranding epidemic
Journal name Ecohealth   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1612-9202
1612-9210
Publication date 2014-09-26
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10393-014-0972-5
Open Access Status
Volume 12
Issue 2
Start page 298
End page 309
Total pages 12
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer New York
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract An investigation into the health of green turtles was undertaken near Gladstone, Queensland, in response to a dramatic increase in stranding numbers in the first half of 2011. A total of 56 live turtles were subject to clinical examination and blood sampling for routine blood profiles, and 12 deceased turtles underwent a thorough necropsy examination. This population of green turtles was found to be in poor body condition and a range of infectious and non-infectious conditions were identified in the unhealthy turtles, including hepato-renal insufficiency (up to 81%, 27/33 based on clinical pathology), cachexia (92%, 11/12), parasitism (75%, 9/12), cardiopulmonary anomalies (42%, 5/12), gastroenteritis (25%, 3/12), masses (25%, 3/12) and mechanical impediments (17%, 2/12 based on necropsy). Overall, there was no evidence to indicate a unifying disease as a primary cause of the mass mortality. Recent adverse weather events, historic regional contamination and nearby industrial activities are discussed as potential causative factors.
Keyword Green turtle
Health
Reptile
Disease
Mortality
Gladstone
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 26 Sep 2014

 
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Created: Thu, 02 Oct 2014, 12:56:39 EST by Dr Helen Owen on behalf of School of Veterinary Science