Evaluation of nurses’ perceptions of the impact of targeted depression education and a screening and referral tool in an acute cardiac setting

Ski, Chantal F., Munian, Sam, Rolley, John X. and Thompson, David R. (2015) Evaluation of nurses’ perceptions of the impact of targeted depression education and a screening and referral tool in an acute cardiac setting. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 24 1-2: 235-243. doi:10.1111/jocn.12703

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Author Ski, Chantal F.
Munian, Sam
Rolley, John X.
Thompson, David R.
Title Evaluation of nurses’ perceptions of the impact of targeted depression education and a screening and referral tool in an acute cardiac setting
Journal name Journal of Clinical Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1365-2702
0962-1067
Publication date 2015-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jocn.12703
Volume 24
Issue 1-2
Start page 235
End page 243
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aims and objectives
The aim of this study was to evaluate nurses' perceptions of an education programme and screening and referral tool designed for cardiac nurses to facilitate depression screening and referral procedures for patients with coronary heart disease.

Background
There is a high prevalence of depression in patients with coronary heart disease that is often undetected. It is important therefore that nurses working with cardiac patients are equipped with the knowledge and skills to recognise the signs and symptoms of depression and refer appropriately.

Design
A qualitative approach with purposive sampling and semi-structural interviews was implemented within the Donabedian ‘Structure-Process-Outcome’ evaluation framework.

Methods
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 cardiac nurses working in a major metropolitan hospital six weeks post-attending an education programme on depression and coronary heart disease. Thematic data analysis was implemented, specifically adhering to Halcomb and Davidson's (2006) pragmatic data analysis, to examine nurse knowledge and experience of depression assessment and referral in an acute cardiac ward.

Results
The key findings of this study were that the education programme: (1) increased the knowledge base of nurses working with cardiac patients on comorbid depression and coronary heart disease, and (2) assisted in the identification of depression and the referral of ‘at risk’ patients.

Conclusions
Emphasis was placed on the translational significance of educating cardiac nurses about depression via the introduction of a depression screening and referral instrument designed specifically for use in the cardiac ward. As a result, participants found they were better equipped to identify depressive symptoms and, guided by the screening instrument, to confidently instigate referral procedures.

Relevance to clinical practice
Much complexity lies in caring for cardiac patients with depression, including issues such as misdiagnosis. Targeted education, including use of appropriate instruments, has the potential to facilitate early recognition of the signs and symptoms of depression in the acute cardiac setting.
Keyword Coronary heart disease
Depression
Nurse education
Screening and referral
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 26 SEP 2014.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 01 Oct 2014, 13:15:21 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work