A neuropsychological study of personality in older adults: Does age moderate the association between openness and conscientiousness and memory and executive function in a sample of older women.

Michelle White (). A neuropsychological study of personality in older adults: Does age moderate the association between openness and conscientiousness and memory and executive function in a sample of older women. Professional Doctorate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Michelle White
Thesis Title A neuropsychological study of personality in older adults: Does age moderate the association between openness and conscientiousness and memory and executive function in a sample of older women.
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Supervisor Associate Professor Gerard Byrne
Professor Nancy Pachana
Total pages 118
Language eng
Subjects 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
Abstract/Summary Abstract Introduction and aims: Recent studies have emphasized the emerging relationship between personality traits and cognitive functioning as central to understanding individual differences. However, results have been fairly inconsistent. One possible explanation for inconsistent findings has been that the personality-cognition association may vary as a function of age although very little research exists to support this notion. Therefore, the current study aimed to follow on from previous research and explore the specific relationships between personality traits of openness and conscientious and memory and executive functioning as these have emerged from the personality-cognition literature as potentially strong and consistent associations. Method: The current study utilised personality and cognitive data from the Australian Longitudinal Assessment of Women study (LAWS) which included 511 women recruited from the Brisbane North region and ranged in age from 40 to 80 years. Personality data was taken from NEO FFI results and selected memory and executive functioning data was used to examine the inter-relationships and the role of ageing. Results: Results indicated that conscientiousness was modestly correlated with a measure of executive functioning (COAST), however the effect remained stable with age. Openness was the only personality trait significantly associated with memory performance (WMS IV - Logical Memory II). However this was also found to remain stable with age. Conclusion: Conscientiousness may be significantly positively associated with executive functioning which appears to remain stable with age. Openness may serve as a protective factor for memory functions that are vulnerable to ageing. Practical real world implications of these results are discussed. These include implications for improving healthy ageing to maximise older adult workforce participation, and improving clinical interventions for older adults to achieve better health outcomes.
Keyword Memory -- Age factors
neuropsychology
Executive functioning

 
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Created: Tue, 30 Sep 2014, 07:54:18 EST by Michelle White on behalf of Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences