Bodyweight and other correlates of symptom-detected breast cancers in a population offered screening

Kricker, Anne, DiSipio, Tracey, Stone, Jennifer, Goumas, Chris, Armes, Jane E., Gertig, Dorota M. and Armstrong, Bruce K. (2012) Bodyweight and other correlates of symptom-detected breast cancers in a population offered screening. Cancer Causes and Control, 23 1: 89-102. doi:10.1007/s10552-011-9858-9


Author Kricker, Anne
DiSipio, Tracey
Stone, Jennifer
Goumas, Chris
Armes, Jane E.
Gertig, Dorota M.
Armstrong, Bruce K.
Title Bodyweight and other correlates of symptom-detected breast cancers in a population offered screening
Journal name Cancer Causes and Control   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0957-5243
1573-7225
Publication date 2012-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10552-011-9858-9
Open Access Status
Volume 23
Issue 1
Start page 89
End page 102
Total pages 14
Place of publication Dordrecht Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Language eng
Subject 2730 Oncology
1306 Cancer Research
Formatted abstract
Objective:
To determine the factors associated with symptom-detected breast cancers in a population offered screening.

Methods:
We interviewed 1,459 Australian women aged 40-69, 946 with symptom-detected and 513 with mammogram-detected invasive breast cancers ≥1.1 cm in diameter about their personal, mammogram, and breast histories before diagnosis and reviewed medical records for tumor characteristics and mammogram dates, calculating ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for symptom- versus mammogram-detected cancers in logistic regression models.

Results:
Lack of regular mammograms (<2 mammograms in the 4.5 years before diagnosis) was the strongest correlate of symptom-detected breast cancer (OR = 3.04 for irregular or no mammograms). In women who had regular mammograms (≥2 mammograms in the 4.5 years before diagnosis), the independent correlates of symptom-detected cancers were low BMI (OR < 25 kg/m 2 vs. ≥ 30 kg/m 2 = 2.18, 95% CI 1.23-3.84; p = 0.008), increased breast density (available in 498 women) (OR highest quarter vs. lowest = 3.50, 95% CI 1.76-6.97; p trend = 0.004), high-grade cancer, and a larger cancer (each p < 0.01). In women who did not have regular mammograms, the independent correlates were age <50 years, a first cancer, and a ≥2-cm cancer. Smoking appeared to modify the association of symptom-detected cancer with low BMI (higher ORs for low BMI in current smokers) and estrogen receptor (ER) status (higher ORs for low BMI in ER cancers).

Conclusion:
Women with low BMI may benefit from a tailored approach to breast cancer detection, particularly if they smoke.
Keyword BMI
Breast cancer
Detection method
Regular mammograms
Symptoms
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ)
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 25 Sep 2014, 08:48:59 EST by System User on behalf of Mater Research Institute-UQ