'Now I'm Part of Australia and I Need to Know What Is Happening Here': case of Hazara male former refugees in Brisbane strategically selecting media to aid acculturation

Tudsri, Pthai and Hebbani, Aparna (2014) 'Now I'm Part of Australia and I Need to Know What Is Happening Here': case of Hazara male former refugees in Brisbane strategically selecting media to aid acculturation. Journal of International Migration and Integration, 16 4: 1273-1289. doi:10.1007/s12134-014-0373-1

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Author Tudsri, Pthai
Hebbani, Aparna
Title 'Now I'm Part of Australia and I Need to Know What Is Happening Here': case of Hazara male former refugees in Brisbane strategically selecting media to aid acculturation
Journal name Journal of International Migration and Integration   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1488-3473
1874-6365
Publication date 2014-09-18
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12134-014-0373-1
Volume 16
Issue 4
Start page 1273
End page 1289
Total pages 17
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Given the steady rise in the number of Hazara seeking asylum in Australia, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of media in their acculturation and to explore whether their level of English language proficiency played a mediating role in selecting certain media platforms over others. Data were collected through 29 participants completing a survey, followed by in-depth interviews with ten Hazara male youths (age ≤18 years) in Brisbane, Australia. The findings suggested that young Hazara men were very selective in their media choice. While some used media to improve their integration into Australia, others consciously chose to separate and be more “Afghan” than “Australian”. In this selection process, their self-awareness with regard to English language proficiency, coupled with how motivated they were to learn English, played a critical mediating role; certain participants who had limited English proficiency and wanted to improve it watched English language media to improve their proficiency. These media were avoided by participants with a similar proficiency who had no interest in improving it; participants representing this group resorted to Hazaragi/Dari media for information and news, instead of the local media. In this study, the latter group also displayed a separation approach of acculturation.
Keyword Refugees
Hazara youth
Media and acculturation
English language proficiency and acculturation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 18 September 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 24 Sep 2014, 10:38:11 EST by Dr Aparna Hebbani on behalf of School of Journalism and Communication