Effects of feeding plant-derived agents on the colonization of Campylobacter jejuni in broiler chickens

Kurekci, Cemil, Al Jassim, Rafat, Hassan, Errol, Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L., Padmanabha, Jagadish and McSweeney, Christopher S. (2014) Effects of feeding plant-derived agents on the colonization of Campylobacter jejuni in broiler chickens. Poultry Science, 93 9: 2337-2346. doi:10.3382/ps.2014-03950


Author Kurekci, Cemil
Al Jassim, Rafat
Hassan, Errol
Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L.
Padmanabha, Jagadish
McSweeney, Christopher S.
Title Effects of feeding plant-derived agents on the colonization of Campylobacter jejuni in broiler chickens
Formatted title
Effects of feeding plant-derived agents on the colonization of Campylobacter jejuni in broiler chickens
Journal name Poultry Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1525-3171
0032-5791
Publication date 2014-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3382/ps.2014-03950
Volume 93
Issue 9
Start page 2337
End page 2346
Total pages 10
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract The aim of this work was to test the potential use of plant-derived extracts and compounds to control Campylobacter jejuni in broiler chickens. Over a 7-wk feeding period, birds were fed a commercial diet with or without plant extracts (Acacia decurrens, Eremophila glabra), essential oil [lemon myrtle oil (LMO)], plant secondary compounds [terpinene-4-ol and a-tops (including a-terpineol, cineole, and terpinene-4-ol)], and the antibiotic virginiamycin. Traditional culture and real-time quantitative PCR techniques were used to enumerate the numbers of C. jejuni in chicken fecal and cecal samples. In addition, BW and feed intake were recorded weekly for the calculation of BW gain and feed conversion ratio. The mean log10 counts of C. jejuni were similar (P > 0.05) across treatments. However, significantly lower levels of fecal Campylobacter counts (P < 0.05) were recorded at d 41 for the a-tops treatment by culture methods. No differences (P > 0.05) in BW gain were obtained for dietary supplementation, except for the E. glabra extract, which had a negative impact (P < 0.001) on BW, resulting in sporadic death. Results from this study suggest that supplemental natural compounds used in the current study did not reduce the shedding of C. jejuni to desired levels.
Keyword Campylobacter jejuni
Chicken
Essential oil
Plant extract
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2015 Collection
 
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