Curriculum development to achieve graduate learning outcomes in science: implications for academic developers

Matthews, Kelly (2014). Curriculum development to achieve graduate learning outcomes in science: implications for academic developers. In: ICED 2014: Educational Development in a Changing World. Abstracts. ICED 2014: International Consortium for Educational Development, Stockholm, Sweden, (281-281). 16-18 June 2014.

Author Matthews, Kelly
Title of paper Curriculum development to achieve graduate learning outcomes in science: implications for academic developers
Conference name ICED 2014: International Consortium for Educational Development
Conference location Stockholm, Sweden
Conference dates 16-18 June 2014
Proceedings title ICED 2014: Educational Development in a Changing World. Abstracts
Place of Publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The International Consortium for Educational Development
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Published abstract
Open Access Status
Start page 281
End page 281
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Like many countries, Australia's higher education policies are focusing on graduate learning outcomes within an environment increasing influenced by quality assurance agendas. Increasingly, academic developers are collaborating on matters of curriculum development, which are situated within the socio-cultural context of disciplines via degree programs. Many centralised centres for academic development are shifting focus from micro-level individualised services to macro-level discipline-based curriculum development activities (Gibbs, 1996; Holt, Palmer & Challis, 2011). However, there is a dearth of research on curriculum change and development to achieve graduate learning outcomes, and fewer that are situated within disciplinary context. The limited discipline-independent research on graduate learning outcomes and curriculum development provides heuristic insights, although the separation from the socio-cultural context of curriculum development in research raises Questions about the applicability to discipline domains in practice (Becher, 1994). Affecting curricular change in the sciences necessitates an understanding of the disciplinary dynamics within which the curricula is situated. As a discipline, science is organised around a body of knowledge that is viewed as hierarchical, leading to instruction and curricula focused on content knowledge (Lattuca & Stark, 2011). Furthermore, the flexible and unstructured nature of science degree programs are inherently difficult to design for graduate learning outcomes.

This paper draws data sourced from 48 interviews from 13 universities within a comparative case study design, which revealed four models for curriculum design typical of science degree programs as they attempt to develop graduate learning outcomes. Implications for academic developers focused on curriculum development to achieve graduate learning outcomes in the sciences are discussed through the lens of both domain-independent (Barrie, 2006; Fraser & Bosanquet, 2006; Yorke & Knight, 2006) and discipline-specific (Matthews et al, 2012) research on curriculum development in higher education.
Keyword Curriculum development
Graduate attributes
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Mon, 15 Sep 2014, 11:09:40 EST by Kelly Matthews on behalf of Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation