Integrated optimisation of grinding and flotation cells

Runge, K. C., Tabosa, E. and Holtham, P. (2014). Integrated optimisation of grinding and flotation cells. In: 12th AusImm Mill Operators' Conference 2014: Proceedings. 12th AusIMM Mill Operators' Conference 2014, Townsville, Australia, (77-84). 1-3 September 2014.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Runge, K. C.
Tabosa, E.
Holtham, P.
Title of paper Integrated optimisation of grinding and flotation cells
Conference name 12th AusIMM Mill Operators' Conference 2014
Conference location Townsville, Australia
Conference dates 1-3 September 2014
Convener David Hunter
Proceedings title 12th AusImm Mill Operators' Conference 2014: Proceedings
Series The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy Publication Series No 9/2014
Place of Publication Carlton, VIC, Australia
Publisher AusIMM: Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
Publication Year 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9781925100143
Start page 77
End page 84
Total pages 8
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Traditionally, comminution and flotation have been surveyed, analysed and optimised separately. This often results in less than optimal outcomes because of the complex interactions between the two processes. Flotation recovery is a strong function of the valuable mineral particle size distribution with lower recovery of ultra-fines due to poor fl otation kinetics, optimum recovery for the intermediate sized particles and lower recovery for the coarser particles due to poorer liberation. Thus, to optimise flotation recovery and grade it is usually best to grind to a fine size. This requirement needs to be balanced by the cost of grinding finer and the revenue that results from an increase in grinding throughput, which often results in a coarsening of the flotation feed.

This paper demonstrates a te chnique which can be used to predict the effect of a change in feed grind size on flotation performance. It can be used to determine the optimum grind size for a particular operation which optimises total circuit profitability. Analysis is relatively easy to perform, as a minimum, requiring only size by assay data of the feed and product streams of the process. Case studies will be presented that demonstrate the usefulness of this technique in feed grind applications. Potential use of the technique for r egrind evaluation is discussed. The limitations associated with this technique in certain circuit scenarios will also be outlined.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 09 Sep 2014, 10:53:28 EST by Karen Holtham on behalf of Julius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre