Corporate character formation and CSR: the function of habit and practice in the mining industry

Owen, John R. and Kemp, Deanna (2014) Corporate character formation and CSR: the function of habit and practice in the mining industry. American Journal of Industrial and Business Management, 4 5: 223-233. doi:10.4236/ajibm.2014.45030

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Author Owen, John R.
Kemp, Deanna
Title Corporate character formation and CSR: the function of habit and practice in the mining industry
Journal name American Journal of Industrial and Business Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2164-5167
2164-5175
Publication date 2014-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.4236/ajibm.2014.45030
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 4
Issue 5
Start page 223
End page 233
Total pages 11
Place of publication Irvine, CA, United States
Publisher Scientific Research Publishing
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The mining industry provides a rich context through which to engage the practical and ethical limits of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Recent debates in organizational ethics have drawn attention to institutional constraints which inhibit awareness raising and ethical practice within corporate settings. During the last decade, the mining industry has come under increasing pressure to improve its environmental, social and ethical performance. In an effort to respond to these more ethically-orientated external expectations, the mining industry has developed a range of internal regulatory mechanisms and process, which can be applied individually or in conjunction with other companies and organizations. This combination of internal and external drivers indicates a growing imperative for mining companies to ground CSR principles in their day-to-day operating practices. The challenge is to avoid organizational rules and procedures for CSR that lack depth and meaning and which fail to result in the wise and courageous use of personal agency. Instead mining companies must work to establish appropriate mechanisms that will see ethical norms adopted as organizational principles that guide, and result in, improved corporate conduct. Using the Aristotelean notion of “character formation”, the authors offer practical considerations for how this might occur in the mining industry.
Keyword Ethical organizations
Corporate social responsibility
Mining
Organizational change
Auditing
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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Created: Sat, 06 Sep 2014, 18:21:18 EST by Deanna Kemp on behalf of Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining