Prevalence and predictors of injecting-related injury and disease among clients of Australia's needle and syringe programs

Topp, Libby, Iversen, Jenny, Conroy, Andrew, Salmon, Allison M. and Maher, Lisa (2008) Prevalence and predictors of injecting-related injury and disease among clients of Australia's needle and syringe programs. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 32 1: 34-37. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2008.00163.x


Author Topp, Libby
Iversen, Jenny
Conroy, Andrew
Salmon, Allison M.
Maher, Lisa
Title Prevalence and predictors of injecting-related injury and disease among clients of Australia's needle and syringe programs
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2008-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2008.00163.x
Volume 32
Issue 1
Start page 34
End page 37
Total pages 4
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To identify lifetime prevalence and predictors of self-reported injecting-related injuries and diseases (IRID) and/or injecting-related problems (IRP) among a national cross-sectional sample of injecting drug users.

Methods: 1,961 clients of 45 needle and syringe programs (NSPs) who participated in the 2006 Australian NSP Survey self-completed an item regarding lifetime experience of eight separate IRIDs and IRPs.

Results: Sixty-nine percent of participants reported a history of IRID/ IRP, with a mean of 1.9 injuries/problems (range 0-8). Lifetime prevalence of specific injuries/problems ranged from problems finding a vein (43%) to endocarditis (4%). Factors independently associated with IRID/IRP included bisexual identity; daily or more frequent injecting; injection of pharmaceutical preparations; female gender; longer injecting history; and hepatitis C antibody-positive serostatus.

Conclusions: Consistent with existing literature, results suggest that vascular injury and localised infections are common among IDUs; and that treatment-seeking is often delayed until serious complications arise.

Implications: Findings support the imperative for co-ordinated and timely treatment and prevention activities to reduce the severity and burden of these prevalent injecting outcomes. 
Keyword Epidemiology
Injections
Needle exchange programs
Substance abuse
Vascular skin diseases
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 27 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 28 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 05 Sep 2014, 01:29:57 EST by Dr Andrew Smirnov on behalf of School of Public Health