Socio-demographic vulnerability to heatwave impacts in Brisbane, Australia: a time series analysis

Toloo, Ghasem (Sam), Guo, Yuming, Turner, Lyle, Qi, Xin, Aitken, Peter and Tong, Shilu (2014) Socio-demographic vulnerability to heatwave impacts in Brisbane, Australia: a time series analysis. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 38 5: 430-435. doi:10.1111/1753-6405.12253


Author Toloo, Ghasem (Sam)
Guo, Yuming
Turner, Lyle
Qi, Xin
Aitken, Peter
Tong, Shilu
Title Socio-demographic vulnerability to heatwave impacts in Brisbane, Australia: a time series analysis
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2014-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12253
Open Access Status
Volume 38
Issue 5
Start page 430
End page 435
Total pages 6
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: Examining the association between socioeconomic disadvantage and heat-related emergency department (ED) visits during heatwave periods in Brisbane, 2000–2008.

Methods: Data from 10 public EDs were analysed using a generalised additive model for disease categories, age groups and gender.

Results: Cumulative relative risks (RR) for non-external causes other than cardiovascular and respiratory diseases were 1.11 and 1.05 in most and least disadvantaged areas, respectively. The pattern persisted on lags 0–2. Elevated risks were observed for all age groups above 15 years in all areas. However, with RRs of 1.19–1.28, the 65–74 years age group in more disadvantaged areas stood out, compared with RR=1.08 in less disadvantaged areas. This pattern was observed on lag 0 but did not persist. The RRs for male presentations were 1.10 and 1.04 in most and less disadvantaged areas; for females, RR was 1.04 in less disadvantaged areas. This pattern persisted across lags 0–2.

Conclusions: Heat-related ED visits increased during heatwaves. However, due to overlapping confidence intervals, variations across socioeconomic areas should be interpreted cautiously.

Implications: ED data may be utilised for monitoring heat-related health impacts, particularly on the first day of heatwaves, to facilitate prompt interventions and targeted resource allocation.
Keyword Socioeconomic disadvantage
Vulnerability
Heatwaves
Emergency departments
Temporal analysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 04 Sep 2014, 10:22:05 EST by Yuming Guo on behalf of School of Public Health