The experiences of parents and nurses of hospitalised infants requiring oxygen therapy for severe bronchiolitis: a phenomenological study

Peeler, Alison, Fulbrook, Paul and Kildea, Sue (2015) The experiences of parents and nurses of hospitalised infants requiring oxygen therapy for severe bronchiolitis: a phenomenological study. Journal of Child Health Care, 19 2: 216-228. doi:10.1177/1367493513503587


Author Peeler, Alison
Fulbrook, Paul
Kildea, Sue
Title The experiences of parents and nurses of hospitalised infants requiring oxygen therapy for severe bronchiolitis: a phenomenological study
Journal name Journal of Child Health Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1367-4935
1741-2889
Publication date 2015
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1367493513503587
Open Access Status
Volume 19
Issue 2
Start page 216
End page 228
Total pages 13
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract Bronchiolitis is a major cause of children’s admission to hospital. The study aim was to describe the experiences of parents who had, or nurses who cared for, a child admitted to hospital for severe bronchiolitis requiring oxygen therapy. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to interview 12 mothers and 12 nurses. The findings were clustered into three domains: fear, parent– child interaction and technical caring. The mothers found the experience to be extremely frightening, based on their fear that their child could die. This was compounded by their lack of knowledge and understanding about what was happening and their inability to fulfil their mothering role. Although nurses recognised that parents were anxious, they did not seem to appreciate fully the depth of fear and emotion that mothers were experiencing and tended to describe procedural aspects of their role. The mothers’ relationship with their child was focused upon physical contact and the desire to comfort their child. Their ability to do so was significantly impacted upon by the method of oxygen delivery to their child. For nurses, although they recognised the psychosocial dimension, their emphasis was on health and safety aspects of oxygen therapy, both for the child and themselves.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 26 Aug 2014, 10:56:27 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work