Beyond the dominant paradigm of communication rights? Observations from South Asia

Thomas, Pradip N. (2014). Beyond the dominant paradigm of communication rights? Observations from South Asia. In Claudia Padovani and Andrew Calabrese (Ed.), Communication rights and social justice: historical accounts of transnational mobilisations (pp. 135-151) Basingstoke, Hampshire, United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan. doi:10.1057/9781137378309

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Author Thomas, Pradip N.
Title of chapter Beyond the dominant paradigm of communication rights? Observations from South Asia
Title of book Communication rights and social justice: historical accounts of transnational mobilisations
Place of Publication Basingstoke, Hampshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1057/9781137378309
Open Access Status
Series Global Transformations in Media and Communication Research
ISBN 9781137378293
9781137433701
9781137378309
9781137433718
Editor Claudia Padovani
Andrew Calabrese
Chapter number 7
Start page 135
End page 151
Total pages 17
Total chapters 16
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Mclver et al. provide one of the better definitions of communication rights (CRs):

The right to communicate is a conceptual framework within which to address issues of access, intellectual freedom, property rights, cultural and linguistic rights and privacy in a digital environment. It provides a way of framing appropriate questions around these issues; the most fundamental question being: How can communication opportunities be assured and enhanced for everyone? (2003, p. 8)

Whilst Mclver and colleagues define CRs in the context of the digital environment, CRs issues are more or less similar in non-digital environments. For the most part, civil society actors, namely concerned academics and international NGOs, have steered this project. There have occasionally been coalitional projects such as the CRIS campaign linked to the UN’s WSIS, but such global iterations have been few and far between. The operationalization of CRs is, in my way of thinking, the most critical issue facing the CRs movement today. Operationalization in this context refers not just to the practicalities – the ‘doing,’ and the shaping and implementation of projects. There is also, as part of the operationalization process, the need to critically assess contemporary reflections on CRs, the political economy of this enterprise, and the need to explore the gaps between theory and practice. Since there is a range of communication deficits faced by communities throughout the world, it would seem appropriate for these communities to articulate these deficits...
Keyword Communication rights
Right to information
Public hearing
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Mon, 25 Aug 2014, 15:56:02 EST by Assoc Prof Pradip Thomas on behalf of School of Journalism and Communication