Theatre's heterotopias: performance and the cultural politics of space

Tompkins, Joanne Theatre's heterotopias: performance and the cultural politics of space. Sydney, NSW, Australia: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Tompkins, Joanne
Title Theatre's heterotopias: performance and the cultural politics of space
Place of Publication Sydney, NSW, Australia
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
Publication year 2014
Sub-type Research book (original research)
Open Access Status
Series Contemporary Performance InterActions
ISBN 9781137362117
9781137362124
9781137362131
9781137359872
9781137455932
Language eng
Total number of pages 232
Collection year 2015
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Theatre's Heterotopias articulates a new methodology for interpreting a space (including architectural, narrative, imaginative, and imaginary) in theatre and performance. A heterotopia is an 'alternative space' that is distinguished from that actual world, but that resonates with it. The value in applying heterotopia to theatre is that in performance, we can actually witness how else space and place might be constituted: it is the point of comparison of what does occur against what else might transpire such that the 'unreal' spaces that comprise a theatrical experience have the capacity to elicit concrete effects beyond its walls. A heterotopia is a technique for exploring theatrical space that affords a better understanding of the theatrical experience, the context in which performance takes place, and the power and knowledge that shape its socio-political context. The book's case studies include site-specificity, selected productions from the National Theatre of Scotland and Shakespeare's Globe, and multimedia performance.
Q-Index Code A1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Mon, 25 Aug 2014, 14:43:16 EST by Ms Stormy Wehi on behalf of School of Communication and Arts