Male ICU nurses’ experiences of taking care of dying patients and their families: a gender analysis

Wu, Tammy W., Oliffe, John L., Bungay, Vicky and Johnson, Joy L. (2015) Male ICU nurses’ experiences of taking care of dying patients and their families: a gender analysis. American Journal of Men's Health, 9 1: 44-52. doi:10.1177/1557988314528236

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Author Wu, Tammy W.
Oliffe, John L.
Bungay, Vicky
Johnson, Joy L.
Title Male ICU nurses’ experiences of taking care of dying patients and their families: a gender analysis
Journal name American Journal of Men's Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1557-9883
1557-9891
Publication date 2015-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1557988314528236
Open Access Status
Volume 9
Issue 1
Start page 44
End page 52
Total pages 9
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA United States
Publisher Sage
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Male intensive care unit (ICU) nurses bring energy and expertise along with an array of beliefs and practices to their workplace. This article investigates the experiences of male ICU nurses in the context of caring for dying patients and their families. Applying a gender analysis, distilled are insights to how masculinities inform and influence the participants’ practices and coping strategies. The findings reveal participants draw on masculine ideals of being a protector and rational in their decisive actions toward meeting the comfort needs of dying patients and their families. Somewhat paradoxically, most participants also transgressed masculine norms by outwardly expressing their feelings and talking about emotions related to these experiences. Participants also reported renewed appreciation of their life and their families and many men chronicled recreational activities and social connectedness as strategies for coping with workplace induced stresses. The findings drawn from this study can guide both formal and informal support services for men who are ICU nurses, which in turn might aid retention of this subgroup of workers.
Keyword Male nurses
Masculinity
Stress coping strategies
Dying Patients
Intensive care
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online before print: 1 April 2014.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 25 Aug 2014, 09:58:27 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work