The crowded sea: Incorporating multiple marine activities in conservation plans can significantly alter spatial priorities

Mazor, Tessa, Possingham, Hugh P., Edelist, Dori, Brokovich, Eran and Kark, Salit (2014) The crowded sea: Incorporating multiple marine activities in conservation plans can significantly alter spatial priorities. PLoS One, 9 8: e104489.1-e104489.16. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0104489

Author Mazor, Tessa
Possingham, Hugh P.
Edelist, Dori
Brokovich, Eran
Kark, Salit
Title The crowded sea: Incorporating multiple marine activities in conservation plans can significantly alter spatial priorities
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2014-08-07
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0104489
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 9
Issue 8
Start page e104489.1
End page e104489.16
Total pages 16
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Subject 1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
1300 Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
2700 Medicine
Abstract Successful implementation of marine conservation plans is largely inhibited by inadequate consideration of the broader social and economic context within which conservation operates. Marine waters and their biodiversity are shared by a host of stakeholders, such as commercial fishers, recreational users and offshore developers. Hence, to improve implementation success of conservation plans, we must incorporate other marine activities while explicitly examining trade-offs that may be required. In this study, we test how the inclusion of multiple marine activities can shape conservation plans. We used the entire Mediterranean territorial waters of Israel as a case study to compare four planning scenarios with increasing levels of complexity, where additional zones, threats and activities were added (e.g., commercial fisheries, hydrocarbon exploration interests, aquaculture, and shipping lanes). We applied the marine zoning decision support tool Marxan to each planning scenario and tested a) the ability of each scenario to reach biodiversity targets, b) the change in opportunity cost and c) the alteration of spatial conservation priorities. We found that by including increasing numbers of marine activities and zones in the planning process, greater compromises are required to reach conservation objectives. Complex plans with more activities incurred greater opportunity cost and did not reach biodiversity targets as easily as simplified plans with less marine activities. We discovered that including hydrocarbon data in the planning process significantly alters spatial priorities. For the territorial waters of Israel we found that in order to protect at least 10% of the range of 166 marine biodiversity features there would be a loss of ∼15% of annual commercial fishery revenue and ∼5% of prospective hydrocarbon revenue. This case study follows an illustrated framework for adopting a transparent systematic process to balance biodiversity goals and economic considerations within a country's territorial waters.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 19 Aug 2014, 00:21:10 EST by System User on behalf of School of Biological Sciences