Punjabi Sikh patients’ perceived barriers to engaging in physical exercise following myocardial infarction

Galdas, Paul M., Oliffe, John L., Kang, H. Bindy K. and Kelly, Mary T. (2012) Punjabi Sikh patients’ perceived barriers to engaging in physical exercise following myocardial infarction. Public Health Nursing, 29 6: 534-541. doi:10.1111/j.1525-1446.2012.01009.x


Author Galdas, Paul M.
Oliffe, John L.
Kang, H. Bindy K.
Kelly, Mary T.
Title Punjabi Sikh patients’ perceived barriers to engaging in physical exercise following myocardial infarction
Journal name Public Health Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0737-1209
1525-1446
Publication date 2012-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1525-1446.2012.01009.x
Open Access Status
Volume 29
Issue 6
Start page 534
End page 541
Total pages 8
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: The aim of this research was to describe Punjabi Sikh patients' perceived barriers to engaging in physical exercise following myocardial infarction (MI).

Design and Sample: A qualitative, interpretive descriptive methodology was used. The sample included 15 Punjabi Sikh patients who were attending a cardiac rehabilitation education program in an urban center of British Columbia, Canada, following MI.

Measurements: Data were collected via semi-structured interviews and were audio recorded, translated from Punjabi to English, and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using an interpretive thematic approach that involved a process of coding and constant comparison.

Results: Four key factors emerged that related to participants' perceived barriers to sustained engagement in physical activity: (1) difficulty in determining safe exertion levels independently; (2) fatigue and weakness; (3) preference for 'informal' exercise; and (4) migration-related challenges.

Conclusions: The findings have implications for the design and delivery of health promotion strategies aimed at Punjabi Sikh patients' post-MI that is contingent on the use of 'formal' exercise settings to promote regular physical activity. The willingness among Punjabi Sikh patients to practise brisk walking offers a positive direction that public health nurses and other healthcare professionals may want to capitalize on in the delivery of exercise-related health promotion.
Keyword Culture
Ethnic minority health
Ethnicity
Exercise
Health promotion
Heart disease
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 18 Aug 2014, 14:19:30 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work