Informing maternity service development by surveying new mothers about preferences for nutrition education during their pregnancy in an area of social disadvantage

Porteous, Helen E., Palmer, Michelle A. and Wilkinson, Shelley Ann (2014) Informing maternity service development by surveying new mothers about preferences for nutrition education during their pregnancy in an area of social disadvantage. Women and Birth, 27 3: 196-201. doi:10.1016/j.wombi.2014.04.001


Author Porteous, Helen E.
Palmer, Michelle A.
Wilkinson, Shelley Ann
Title Informing maternity service development by surveying new mothers about preferences for nutrition education during their pregnancy in an area of social disadvantage
Journal name Women and Birth   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1871-5192
1878-1799
Publication date 2014-09-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.wombi.2014.04.001
Volume 27
Issue 3
Start page 196
End page 201
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: A demonstrated link exists between maternal diet and maternal and infant health outcomes during and after pregnancy. A dietetic maternity service (0.6FTE for 3500 births) was introduced in 2012 at our hospital in a socially-disadvantaged area. We needed to develop evidence-based, patient-oriented improvements to nutrition services within resource limitations.
Aim: This cross-sectional study gathered knowledge, eating behaviours, and nutrition-related needs of our women ante- and postnatally to inform this process.
Methods: Women (≥18 years) admitted to the postnatal ward completed our survey. Data including dietary quality, nutritional knowledge and interest in nutrition education were collected. Analysis included descriptive, chi-squared and t-tests.
Findings: Three hundred and nine eligible women responded (28 ± 6 years, 27 ± 7 kg/m2 pre-pregnancy body mass index, 12% gestational diabetes). Two-fifths (42%) self-reported gaining excess weight during pregnancy. One quarter reported knowing their gestational weight gain goals, yet only 1.6% was correct. Half reported interest in receiving nutrition education during pregnancy and post-delivery (45%, n = 134; 43%, n = 123, respectively). Women had poor diet quality (daily serves – fruit: 1.8 ± 1.0; vegetables: 2.0 ± 1.2; dairy: 1.9 ± 1.2), despite identifying healthy eating as a personal priority. Nutrition topics requested included healthy eating for development of baby pre- and post-delivery and maternal weight management.
Conclusion: Women attending our hospital have dietary issues and levels of interest in nutrition similar to women in tertiary maternity centres. Service changes planned will explore formats that meet higher and lower education levels; group workshops may be supplemented by formats such as internet and DVD-delivered education to overcome access and literacy issues, respectively.
Keyword Maternal health services
Nutrition
Preferences
Dietetics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 14 Aug 2014, 04:07:28 EST by Shelley Wilkinson on behalf of School of Pharmacy