Flipping the classroom at scale to achieve integration of theory and practice in a first year engineering design and build course

Reidsema, Carl A., Kavanagh, Lydia and Jolly, Lesley (2014). Flipping the classroom at scale to achieve integration of theory and practice in a first year engineering design and build course. In: The ASEE 2014 Annual Conference and Exposition 360 Degrees of Engineering Education: proceedings. 121st ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: 360 Degrees of Engineering Education, Indianapolis, IN United States, (). 15-18 June 2014.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Reidsema, Carl A.
Kavanagh, Lydia
Jolly, Lesley
Title of paper Flipping the classroom at scale to achieve integration of theory and practice in a first year engineering design and build course
Conference name 121st ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: 360 Degrees of Engineering Education
Conference location Indianapolis, IN United States
Conference dates 15-18 June 2014
Convener ASEE
Proceedings title The ASEE 2014 Annual Conference and Exposition 360 Degrees of Engineering Education: proceedings
Journal name ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
Series ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
Place of Publication Washigton, DC United States
Publisher American Society for Engineering Education
Publication Year 2014
Year available 2014
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
Total pages 13
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract/Summary There are a number of challenges in the development of first year inter-faculty engineering "cornerstone" design courses, not least of which is the need to integrate engineering fundamentals (theory) with engaging authentic team-based design (practice). Achieving this integration requires deliberate alignment of fundamentals to what can be wide variations in both academic and student conceptions of discipline. Within a course, integration must be achieved such that concepts are constructively aligned to the downstream artefacts of multiple hands-on design projects to avoid being interpreted as additional material to be learned but irrelevant to major assessment goals. A further challenge in an environment of ever-increasing class sizes is the development of an approach that allows for scale-up, yet also ensures students actually achieve requisite theoretical knowledge, professional ability, and behavioural learning outcomes. A large scale (1200 students) Flipped Classroom (FC) second-semester first-year engineering compulsory course was designed, implemented, operated and evaluated at a leading researchintensive university in Australia over the past 3 years to address these challenges. The FC model, where material is delivered online allowing face-to-face interactions to be grounded in authentic disciplinary practices, aligned with the need for scale-up. Integrating theory with practice in this way is necessary to drive deeper conceptual understanding of engineering fundamentals2, 9. This paper will elaborate on the curriculum design rationale for this course, its implementation, and the results of the extensive and ongoing evaluation. The methods and process detailed in the paper can be used to aid similar processes.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Paper ID #9716

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Engineering Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 12 Aug 2014, 03:53:07 EST by System User on behalf of School of Engineering