Associations of overall sitting time and sitting time in different contexts with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms

Rebar, Amanda L., Vandelanotte, Corneel, Van Uffelen, Jannique, Short, Camille and Duncan, Mitch J. (2014) Associations of overall sitting time and sitting time in different contexts with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. Mental Health and Physical Activity, 7 2: 105-110. doi:10.1016/j.mhpa.2014.02.004

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Author Rebar, Amanda L.
Vandelanotte, Corneel
Van Uffelen, Jannique
Short, Camille
Duncan, Mitch J.
Title Associations of overall sitting time and sitting time in different contexts with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms
Journal name Mental Health and Physical Activity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1878-0199
1755-2966
Publication date 2014-06
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.mhpa.2014.02.004
Open Access Status
Volume 7
Issue 2
Start page 105
End page 110
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Spending a lot of time sitting has been linked to more depressive symptoms and spending a lot of time engaged in screen-based sitting has been linked to greater likelihood of having mental disorders and poorer psychological distress. The purpose of this study was to examine whether overall sitting time and time spent sitting in different contexts was associated with depression, anxiety, or stress symptoms. Sitting time (time spent sitting on typical work- and non-work days while engaged in leisure activities, working, using a computer, watching television, and in transport) and symptom severity of depression, anxiety, and stress were self-reported in a cross-sectional online survey in 2012 by Australian adults (N = 1,104, 55% female, M age = 58 years). Associations were examined using negative binomial regression analyses accounting for the covariates of physical activity, sex, age, income, education, and presence of chronic conditions. Overall sitting time was significantly associated with more severe depression (b = 0.01, 95% CI = 0.00 to 0.02) and anxiety (b = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.02 to 0.04) but not stress (b = 0.01, 95% CI = −0.00 to 0.02) symptoms. Time spent sitting while at a computer was associated with more severe depression (b = 0.04, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.07) and anxiety (b = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.00 to 0.06) symptoms, and time spent sitting while in transport was associated with more severe anxiety (b = 0.09, 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.13) and stress (b = 0.05, 95% CI = 0.02 to 0.08) symptoms. Limiting overall sitting time and time spent sitting while at a computer or in transport could be potential strategies to improve mental health.
Keyword Sedentary behaviour
Mental health
Physical activity
Exercise
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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