Brain activity associated with the illusion of motion evoked by different vibration stimulation devices: an fNIRS study

Imai, Ryota, Hayashida, Kazuki, Nakano, Hideki and Morioka, Shu (2014) Brain activity associated with the illusion of motion evoked by different vibration stimulation devices: an fNIRS study. Journal of Physical Therapy Science, 26 7: 1115-1119. doi:10.1589/jpts.26.1115


Author Imai, Ryota
Hayashida, Kazuki
Nakano, Hideki
Morioka, Shu
Title Brain activity associated with the illusion of motion evoked by different vibration stimulation devices: an fNIRS study
Journal name Journal of Physical Therapy Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0915-5287
2187-5626
Publication date 2014-07-30
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1589/jpts.26.1115
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 26
Issue 7
Start page 1115
End page 1119
Total pages 5
Place of publication Tokyo, Japan
Publisher I P E C
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract [Purpose] A number of different stimulation devices are used in basic and clinical research studies, and their frequencies of use vary. However, whether or not they are equally effective has not been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to investigate neural activity in the brain during the illusion of motion evoked by stimulating the tendons of the wrist extensor muscles using various vibration devices. [Subjects] Twelve righthanded university students with no history of nervous system disorder or orthopedic disease participated in the study. [Methods] The wrist extensor tendon was stimulated using 3 different devices: 1) a vibration stimulation device (SL-0105 LP; Asahi Seisakusho Co., Ltd., Saitama, Japan), frequency 80 Hz; 2) a handy massager (YCM-20; Yamazen Corporation, Osaka, Japan), frequency 70 Hz; and 3) a handy massager (Thrive MD-01; Thrive Co., Ltd., Osaka, Japan), frequency 91.7 Hz. Brain activity was recorded during stimulation by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy. [Results] Increased neural activity was observed in both the premotor cortices and the parietal region in both hemispheres in all 3 cases. The level and localization of neural activity was comparable for all 3 stimulation devices used. [Conclusion] This suggests that subjects experience the illusion of motion while the tendon is being stimulated using any vibration device.
Keyword Illusion of motion
Tendon vibration
fNIRS
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 12 Aug 2014, 00:21:35 EST by System User on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute